Water Resources Research


Climatic, Hydrological, and Land Use Impacts on Large Rivers

Climatic, Hydrological, and Land Use Impacts on Large Rivers

Guest Editor(s): H. Habersack

Description: Rivers provide mankind with key benefits, such as water supply, food, hydropower, navigation, irrigation, ecosystem services, and recreation. They are fundamental to life and frequently possess major cultural significance. However, they are currently threatened by unsustainable "overuse", increasing human pressure on their catchments, and problems of increased floods and droughts driven by climate change, leading to changes in morphology, increased pollution, degradation of aquatic habitats, extinction of fish species etc. All these changes detract from the many benefits that rivers provide to mankind and rivers' continuing contribution to human needs. In order to discuss these threats and challenges, AGU intends to publish a special issue of Water Resources Research under the title "Climatic, Hydrological, and Land Use Impacts on Large Rivers," collecting and consolidating those conference papers from the World's Large Rivers Conference 2011 which focus on adaption strategies and the development of new methods to determine and mitigate hydrological alterations of large river systems in a changing environment.

  1. Editor's Preface to a Special Collection

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Preface to a Special Collection
    3. Regular Article
    4. Regular Articles
    5. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
  2. Regular Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Preface to a Special Collection
    3. Regular Article
    4. Regular Articles
    5. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      The influence of land-use composition on fecal contamination of riverine source water in southern British Columbia

      Jacques St Laurent and Asit Mazumder

      Version of Record online: 15 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012455

      Key Points

      • Land-use impact on fecal contamination among 42 riverine sites examined
      • Agriculture and urban land-use presented greatest threat to water quality
      • Further factors included wastewater, low dilution, and higher temperatures
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      The influence of reservoirs, climate, land use and hydrologic conditions on loads and chemical quality of dissolved organic carbon in the Colorado River

      Matthew P. Miller

      Version of Record online: 21 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012312

      Key Points

      • Climate, land use and hydrology interact to control DOC quantity and quality
      • Large reservoirs alter the quantity and quality of DOC in the Colorado River
      • River regulation overshadows watershed processes controlling DOC transport
  3. Regular Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Preface to a Special Collection
    3. Regular Article
    4. Regular Articles
    5. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      A novel approach to flow estimation in tidal rivers (pages 4817–4832)

      H. R. Moftakhari, D. A. Jay, S. A. Talke, T. Kukulka and P. D. Bromirski

      Version of Record online: 7 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/wrcr.20363

      Key Points

      • estimating river discharge for time periods with tidal data but no flow record.
      • moves the nexus of measurement away from the complexities of the delta
      • captures important climate cycles and long-term hydrological trends
    2. You have free access to this content
      Finding appropriate bias correction methods in downscaling precipitation for hydrologic impact studies over North America (pages 4187–4205)

      Jie Chen, François P. Brissette, Diane Chaumont and Marco Braun

      Version of Record online: 23 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/wrcr.20331

      Key Points

      • Bias correction methods were evaluated with respect to hydrological modeling.
      • Distribution-based bias correction methods are better than mean-based methods.
      • The performance of bias correction is location-dependent.
    3. You have free access to this content
      Hydrological change detection using modeling: Half a century of runoff from four rivers in the Blue Nile Basin (pages 3842–3851)

      Solomon Gebreyohannis Gebrehiwot, Jan Seibert, Annemieke I. Gärdenäs, Per-Erik Mellander and Kevin Bishop

      Version of Record online: 27 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/wrcr.20319

      Key Points

      • Hydrological regime of the 4 watersheds is not so much changing.
      • Watershed characteristics could be changing
      • Differences between watersheds were more pronounced than temporal changes
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      The effect of dams on phosphorus in the middle and lower Yangtze river (pages 3659–3669)

      Jianjun Zhou, Man Zhang and Pingyu Lu

      Version of Record online: 21 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/wrcr.20283

      Key Points

      • Sediment has be reduced by 91 % by the dams upstream
      • Reservoirs sequestered 77 % total phosphorus with sedimentation
      • The near extinction of the endemic four major carps strongly related to the dams
    5. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Decoding the drivers of bank erosion on the Mekong river: The roles of the Asian monsoon, tropical storms, and snowmelt (pages 2146–2163)

      Stephen E. Darby, Julian Leyland, Matti Kummu, Timo A. Räsänen and Hannu Lauri

      Version of Record online: 25 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/wrcr.20205

      Key Points

      • IOD events have a greater effect on Mekong bank erosion than ENSO events
      • Snow/glacier melt and tropical storms both affect Mekong River bank erosion
      • Mekong flows driving bank erosion have become increasingly variable
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      Long-term trends in evapotranspiration and runoff over the drainage basins of the Gulf of Mexico during 1901–2008 (pages 1988–2012)

      Mingliang Liu, Hanqin Tian, Qichun Yang, Jia Yang, Xia Song, Steven E. Lohrenz and Wei-Jun Cai

      Version of Record online: 23 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/wrcr.20180

      Key Points

      • Significant regional differences in ET and R trends are found.
      • Land use change, as well as climate change, affects trends of water fluxes
      • None significant long-term trends in freshwater discharge to the GOM is found
    7. You have free access to this content
      Spatial scale of land-use impacts on riverine drinking source water quality (pages 1591–1601)

      Tim Hurley and Asit Mazumder

      Version of Record online: 27 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/wrcr.20154

      Key Points

      • Microbial water quality most closely related to local landuse
      • Organic carbon concentrations only associated with entire watershed landuse
      • Work supports watershed scale management to protect drinking water sources
    8. You have free access to this content
      Quantifying uncertainty sources in an ensemble of hydrological climate-impact projections (pages 1523–1536)

      T. Bosshard, M. Carambia, K. Goergen, S. Kotlarski, P. Krahe, M. Zappa and C. Schär

      Version of Record online: 26 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2011WR011533

      Key Points

      • ANOVA method applied to climate-impact modeling
      • Detailed assessment of changes in water balance quantities due to climate change
      • Interactions of uncertainty sources
    9. You have free access to this content
      In bad waters: Water year classification in nonstationary climates (pages 1137–1148)

      Sarah E. Null and Joshua H. Viers

      Version of Record online: 12 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/wrcr.20097

      Key Points

      • The frequency of water year types changes significantly with climate change.
      • Strategies to adapt water year classification indices affect water allocations.
      • Water year indices determine how much water ecosystems receive.
  4. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Preface to a Special Collection
    3. Regular Article
    4. Regular Articles
    5. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Comparison of Lake Ontario and St. Lawrence River hydrologic droughts and their relationship to climate indices (pages 1396–1409)

      Stacey Biron, Ali A. Assani, Jean-Jacques Frenette and Philippe Massicotte

      Version of Record online: 19 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2012WR013441

      Key Points

      • Long-term trend analyses revealed increase in water level of Ontario Lake
      • Long-term trend analyses revealed decrease in water level in St. Lawrence River
      • Shift in mean water level in both systems was not synchronous

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