Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres (1984–2012)


  1. Climate and Dynamics

    1. Top of page
    2. Climate and Dynamics
    3. Composition and Chemistry
    4. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Decreased albedo, e-folding depth and photolytic OH radical and NO2 production with increasing black carbon content in Arctic snow

      H. J. Reay, J. L. France and M. D. King

      Article first published online: 12 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016630

      Key Points

      • With ~10-20 ng g-1 of black carbon (BC) in snow, absorption becomes BC dominated
      • Doubling black carbon reduces the e-folding depth to ~70% of its initial value
      • Doubling black carbon decreases F(OH) and F(NO2) to ~70% and ~65% respectively
  2. Composition and Chemistry

    1. Top of page
    2. Climate and Dynamics
    3. Composition and Chemistry
    4. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Carbonaceous species and humic like substances (HULIS) in Arctic snowpack during OASIS field campaign in Barrow

      Didier Voisin, Jean-Luc Jaffrezo, Stéphan Houdier, Manuel Barret, Julie Cozic, Martin D. King, James L. France, Holly J. Reay, Amanda Grannas, Gregor Kos, Parisa A. Ariya, Harry J. Beine and Florent Domine

      Article first published online: 5 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016612

      Key Points

      • Total Carbon Content is measured as a funtion of snow type
      • We discuss these concentrations in regard to snow physical evolution
      • First HULIS concentration and optical properties measurement in snow
    2. You have free access to this content
      Springtime boundary layer ozone depletion at Barrow, Alaska: Meteorological influence, year-to-year variation, and long-term change

      Samuel J. Oltmans, Bryan J. Johnson and Joyce M. Harris

      Article first published online: 18 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016889

      Key Points

      • Changing sea ice conditions are altering ozone boundary layer chemistry
      • Spring boundary layer ozone depletion events have increased in March at Barrow
      • Boundary layer ozone depletion at Barrow is strongly influenced by transport
    3. You have free access to this content
      PTR-MS observations of photo-enhanced VOC release from Arctic and midlatitude snow

      S. S. Gao, S. J. Sjostedt, S. Sharma, S. R. Hall, K. Ullmann and J. P. D. Abbatt

      Article first published online: 31 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD017152

      Key Points

      • PTR-MS was used to make real-time measurements of VOCs from irradiated snow
      • Similar VOCs were emitted from irradiated snow from vastly different locations
      • VOCs emission are potentially affected by snow composition (organics, oxidants)
    4. You have free access to this content
      Observations of inorganic bromine (HOBr, BrO, and Br2) speciation at Barrow, Alaska, in spring 2009

      J. Liao, L. G. Huey, D. J. Tanner, F. M. Flocke, J. J. Orlando, J. A. Neuman, J. B. Nowak, A. J. Weinheimer, S. R. Hall, J. N. Smith, A. Fried, R. M. Staebler, Y. Wang, J.-H. Koo, C. A. Cantrell, P. Weibring, J. Walega, D. J. Knapp, P. B. Shepson and C. R. Stephens

      Article first published online: 30 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016641

      Key Points

      • First observations of HOBr are presented
      • Direct evidence for high winds activating bromine
      • HOBr can be reproduced with model including aerosol uptake
    5. You have free access to this content
      Soluble chromophores in marine snow, seawater, sea ice and frost flowers near Barrow, Alaska

      Harry Beine, Cort Anastasio, Florent Domine, Thomas Douglas, Manuel Barret, James France, Martin King, Sam Hall and Kirk Ullmann

      Article first published online: 23 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016650

      Key Points

      • Light absorption in frost flowers is 40 times larger than in terrestrial snow
      • H2O2, NO3-, NO2- contribute <1% to light absorption in marine samples
      • CDOM is a major source of OH in our marine samples
    6. You have free access to this content
      Structure, specific surface area and thermal conductivity of the snowpack around Barrow, Alaska

      Florent Domine, Jean-Charles Gallet, Josué Bock and Samuel Morin

      Article first published online: 15 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016647

      Key Points

      • The specific surface area and heat conductivity of snow at Barrow were measured
      • Snow properties are highly influenced by climate, in particular wind
      • The properties of the Barrow snow allow efficient storage of chemical species
    7. You have free access to this content
      Chemical composition of the snowpack during the OASIS spring campaign 2009 at Barrow, Alaska

      H. W. Jacobi, D. Voisin, J. L. Jaffrezo, J. Cozic and T. A. Douglas

      Article first published online: 14 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016654

      Key Points

      • Chemical composition of the Arctic snowpack
      • Major processes influencing the chemistry of the snowpack
      • Investigation of physical and chemical processes in the snow
    8. You have free access to this content
      Hydroxyl radical and NOx production rates, black carbon concentrations and light-absorbing impurities in snow from field measurements of light penetration and nadir reflectivity of onshore and offshore coastal Alaskan snow

      J. L. France, H. J. Reay, M. D. King, D. Voisin, H. W. Jacobi, F. Domine, H. Beine, C. Anastasio, A. MacArthur and J. Lee-Taylor

      Article first published online: 9 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016639

      Key Points

      • Black carbon and HULIS required to explain snow absorption
      • Nitrite photolysis contributes more to NOx production than anticipated
      • Snowpacks at Barrow are optically very similar
    9. You have free access to this content
      The relative importance of chlorine and bromine radicals in the oxidation of atmospheric mercury at Barrow, Alaska

      Chelsea R. Stephens, Paul B. Shepson, Alexandra Steffen, Jan W. Bottenheim, Jin Liao, L. Greg Huey, Eric Apel, Andy Weinheimer, Samuel R. Hall, Christopher Cantrell, Barkley C. Sive, D. J. Knapp, D. D. Montzka and Rebecca S. Hornbrook

      Article first published online: 3 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016649

      Key Points

      • We previously did not know what halogen radicals were oxidizing Hg in the Arctic
      • We now know that all of Br, BrO and Cl can be important
      • We really need to measure the T-dependent rate constants, especially for Cl atom
    10. You have free access to this content
      Frost flowers growing in the Arctic ocean-atmosphere–sea ice–snow interface: 2. Mercury exchange between the atmosphere, snow, and frost flowers

      Laura S. Sherman, Joel D. Blum, Thomas A. Douglas and Alexandra Steffen

      Article first published online: 9 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016186

      Key Points

      • Hg stable isotopes can be used to trace Hg cycling during AMDEs
      • Frost flowers adsorb Hg that is reemitted from snow during AMDEs
      • Frost flowers aid in the local retention of Hg on sea ice during AMDEs
    11. You have free access to this content
      Frost flowers growing in the Arctic ocean-atmosphere–sea ice–snow interface: 1. Chemical composition

      Thomas A. Douglas, Florent Domine, Manuel Barret, Cort Anastasio, Harry J. Beine, Jan Bottenheim, Amanda Grannas, Stephan Houdier, Stoyka Netcheva, Glenn Rowland, Ralf Staebler and Alexandra Steffen

      Article first published online: 9 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016460

      Key Points

      • Brine and frost flowers on sea ice have interactions with the lower atmosphere
      • Frost flowers have some predictable and some unpredictable chemical composition
      • Changing sea ice regimes likely mean more brine and frost flowers in the future
    12. You have free access to this content
      An isotopic view on the connection between photolytic emissions of NOx from the Arctic snowpack and its oxidation by reactive halogens

      S. Morin, J. Erbland, J. Savarino, F. Domine, J. Bock, U. Friess, H.-W. Jacobi, H. Sihler and J. M. F. Martins

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016618

      Key Points

      • Comprehensive (N and O) isotopic composition of nitrate over one year at Barrow
      • NOx emissions by the snowpack strongly interact with reactive halogens
      • No significant correlation is found between daily averaged ozone, BrO and D17O
    13. You have free access to this content
      Nitrous acid (HONO) during polar spring in Barrow, Alaska: A net source of OH radicals?

      G. Villena, P. Wiesen, C. A. Cantrell, F. Flocke, A. Fried, S. R. Hall, R. S. Hornbrook, D. Knapp, E. Kosciuch, R. L. Mauldin III, J. A. McGrath, D. Montzka, D. Richter, K. Ullmann, J. Walega, P. Weibring, A. Weinheimer, R. M. Staebler, J. Liao, L. G. Huey and J. Kleffmann

      Article first published online: 23 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016643

      Key Points

      • Polar HONO concentrations much lower compared to previous studies
      • HONO is still a major source of OH radicals in the polar atmosphere
      • Photochemical HONO formation by a long wavelength range process including NO2
    14. You have free access to this content
      The specific surface area and chemical composition of diamond dust near Barrow, Alaska

      Florent Domine, Jean-Charles Gallet, Manuel Barret, Stéphan Houdier, Didier Voisin, Thomas A. Douglas, Joel D. Blum, Harry J. Beine, Cort Anastasio and François-Marie Bréon

      Article first published online: 14 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016162

      Key Points

      • The specific surface area of diamond dust has been measured
      • Aldehydes, ions, mercury, H2O2, organic carbon were measured in diamond dust
      • Evidence for photochemistry in precipitated diamond dust is presented
    15. You have free access to this content
      Soluble, light-absorbing species in snow at Barrow, Alaska

      Harry Beine, Cort Anastasio, Giulio Esposito, Kelley Patten, Elizabeth Wilkening, Florent Domine, Didier Voisin, Manuel Barret, Stephan Houdier and Sam Hall

      Article first published online: 28 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016181

      Key Points

      • Snow chromophores are 50:50 HULIS & unknown, HOOH & NO3- are minor contributions
      • Four sources of chromophores: vegetation, marine, diamond dust, & atmos. exchange
      • Photo-bleaching of chromophores in snow is significant
    16. You have free access to this content
      The vertical distribution of BrO and aerosols in the Arctic: Measurements by active and passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy

      U. Frieß, H. Sihler, R. Sander, D. Pöhler, S. Yilmaz and U. Platt

      Article first published online: 27 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD015938

      Key Points

      • Simultaneous measurement of vertical profiles of aerosol extinction and BrO
      • BrO release from aerosols and airborne ice particles
      • BrO emission from first-year sea ice or frost flowers at low temperatures
    17. You have free access to this content
      Formaldehyde in the Alaskan Arctic snowpack: Partitioning and physical processes involved in air-snow exchanges

      Manuel Barret, Florent Domine, Stephan Houdier, Jean-Charles Gallet, Petter Weibring, James Walega, Alan Fried and Dirk Richter

      Article first published online: 17 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016038

      Key Points

      • HCHO in snow equilibrates by solid state diffusion
      • A photochemical production of HCHO takes place in the snowpack
    18. You have free access to this content
      A comparison of Arctic BrO measurements by chemical ionization mass spectrometry and long path-differential optical absorption spectroscopy

      J. Liao, H. Sihler, L. G. Huey, J. A. Neuman, D. J. Tanner, U. Friess, U. Platt, F. M. Flocke, J. J. Orlando, P. B. Shepson, H. J. Beine, A. J. Weinheimer, S. J. Sjostedt, J. B. Nowak, D. J. Knapp, R. M. Staebler, W. Zheng, R. Sander, S. R. Hall and K. Ullmann

      Article first published online: 5 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JD014788

  3. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Climate and Dynamics
    3. Composition and Chemistry
    4. Research Articles
    1. Climate and Dynamics

      You have free access to this content
      Boundary layer dynamics during the Ocean-Atmosphere-Sea-Ice-Snow (OASIS) 2009 experiment at Barrow, AK (pages 2261–2278)

      Patrick Boylan, Detlev Helmig, Ralf Staebler, Andrew Turnipseed, Chris Fairall and William Neff

      Article first published online: 13 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JD020299

      Key Points

      • Sustained shallow boundary layer height observed at coastal arctic site
      • Agreement of seven sonic anemometers deployed in arctic field study
      • Ozone depletion events had a tendency to coincide with low boundary layer height

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION