Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres


  1. Aerosol and Clouds

    1. Top of page
    2. Aerosol and Clouds
    3. Composition and Chemistry
    4. Regular Articles
    5. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Spectral aerosol direct radiative forcing from airborne radiative measurements during CalNex and ARCTAS

      Samuel E. LeBlanc, K. S. Schmidt, P. Pilewskie, J. Redemann, C. Hostetler, R. Ferrare, J. Hair, J. M. Langridge and D. A. Lack

      Version of Record online: 25 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018106

      Key Points

      • The range of aircraft-derived aerosol radiative forcing over various regions
      • Derive spectral forcing efficiency from airborne irradiance measurements
      • Compare irradiance-derived aerosol optical properties with in-situ measurements
  2. Composition and Chemistry

    1. Top of page
    2. Aerosol and Clouds
    3. Composition and Chemistry
    4. Regular Articles
    5. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Secondary organic aerosol formation from fossil fuel sources contribute majority of summertime organic mass at Bakersfield

      Shang Liu, Lars Ahlm, Douglas A. Day, Lynn M. Russell, Yunliang Zhao, Drew R. Gentner, Robin J. Weber, Allen H. Goldstein, Mohammed Jaoui, John H. Offenberg, Tadeusz E. Kleindienst, Caitlin Rubitschun, Jason D. Surratt, Rebecca J. Sheesley and Scott Scheller

      Version of Record online: 15 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018170

      Key Points

      • SOA from fossil fuel emissions contributes a major fraction to the organic mass
      • Biogenic SOA contributes significantly to nighttime organic mass
      • FTIR spectra of SOA components are source-specific
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      Airborne observations of methane emissions from rice cultivation in the Sacramento Valley of California

      J. Peischl, T. B. Ryerson, J. S. Holloway, M. Trainer, A. E. Andrews, E. L. Atlas, D. R. Blake, B. C. Daube, E. J. Dlugokencky, M. L. Fischer, A. H. Goldstein, A. Guha, T. Karl, J. Kofler, E. Kosciuch, P. K. Misztal, A. E. Perring, I. B. Pollack, G. W. Santoni, J. P. Schwarz, J. R. Spackman, S. C. Wofsy and D. D. Parrish

      Version of Record online: 8 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD017994

      Key Points

      • CH4 levels in Sacramento Valley higher during rice growing season than before
      • Rice CH4 fluxes between 0.6 and 2.0% of CO2 taken up by photosynthesis
      • Inventoried emission rate is a factor of three lower than probably CH4 emissions
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      The sea breeze/land breeze circulation in Los Angeles and its influence on nitryl chloride production in this region

      N. L. Wagner, T. P. Riedel, J. M. Roberts, J. A. Thornton, W. M. Angevine, E. J. Williams, B. M. Lerner, A. Vlasenko, S. M. Li, W. P. Dubé, D. J. Coffman, D. M. Bon, J. A. de Gouw, W. C. Kuster, J. B. Gilman and S. S. Brown

      Version of Record online: 27 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD017810

      Key Points

      • The land breeze transports urban air off shore during the night
      • The urban plume in Santa Monica Bay contains ppb levels of ClNO2
      • ClNO2 is produced over Los Angeles and transported to Santa Monica Bay
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      CalNex cloud properties retrieved from a ship-based spectrometer and comparisons with satellite and aircraft retrieved cloud properties

      P. J. McBride, K. S. Schmidt, P. Pilewskie, A. Walther, A. K. Heidinger, D. E. Wolfe, C. W. Fairall and S. Lance

      Version of Record online: 17 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD017624

      Key Points

      • Cloud properties are retrieved from ground-based spectral solar radiation
      • Ground-based retrievals are compared with in situ and spaceborne observations
      • Cloud statistics from surface are consistent with space-based statistics
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      Springtime high surface ozone events over the western United States: Quantifying the role of stratospheric intrusions

      Meiyun Lin, Arlene M. Fiore, Owen R. Cooper, Larry W. Horowitz, Andrew O. Langford, Hiram Levy II, Bryan J. Johnson, Vaishali Naik, Samuel J. Oltmans and Christoph J. Senff

      Version of Record online: 12 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018151

      Key Points

      • Stratospheric intrusions can episodically increase surface ozone by 20-40 ppbv
      • These intrusion events can push ground-level ozone over the health-based limit
      • Global high-res model, satellite and in situ observations yield process insights
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      On the gas-particle partitioning of soluble organic aerosol in two urban atmospheres with contrasting emissions: 2. Gas and particle phase formic acid

      Jiumeng Liu, Xiaolu Zhang, Eric T. Parker, Patrick R. Veres, James M. Roberts, Joost A. de Gouw, Patrick L. Hayes, Jose L. Jimenez, Jennifer G. Murphy, Raluca A. Ellis, L. Greg Huey and Rodney J. Weber

      Version of Record online: 5 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD017912

      Key Points

      • Photochemical source for formic acid in both Los Angeles and Atlanta
      • Differences in formic acid absorbing phases observed in LA and Atlanta
      • Formic acid partitioning greatly under-predicted by thermodynamic model
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      Heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by field-collected atmospheric particles below 273 K

      Bingbing Wang, Alexander Laskin, Tobias Roedel, Mary K. Gilles, Ryan C. Moffet, Alexei V. Tivanski and Daniel A. Knopf

      Version of Record online: 25 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD017446

      Key Points

      • Field-collected urban aerosol particles are associated with organic matter
      • Water uptake and immersion freezing are determined by particle chemistry
      • Atmospheric particles form ice differently compared to lab-generated particles
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      Long-term trends in nitrogen oxide emissions from motor vehicles at national, state, and air basin scales

      Brian C. McDonald, Timothy R. Dallmann, Elliot W. Martin and Robert A. Harley

      Version of Record online: 21 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018304

      Key Points

      • Gasoline NOx emissions decreasing steadily, 1990-2010
      • Diesel NOx emissions increasing or stable up to 2007
      • Diesel is dominant NOx source in California's San Joaquin Valley
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      Multiyear trends in volatile organic compounds in Los Angeles, California: Five decades of decreasing emissions

      Carsten Warneke, Joost A. de Gouw, John S. Holloway, Jeff Peischl, Thomas B. Ryerson, Elliot Atlas, Don Blake, Michael Trainer and David D. Parrish

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD017899

      Key Points

      • VOCs and CO have decreased by a large factor in LA since 1960s
      • VOC emission ratios have not changed
      • Rate of decrease in London is more rapid, but started later
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      On the gas-particle partitioning of soluble organic aerosol in two urban atmospheres with contrasting emissions: 1. Bulk water-soluble organic carbon

      Xiaolu Zhang, Jiumeng Liu, Eric T. Parker, Patrick L. Hayes, Jose L. Jimenez, Joost A. de Gouw, James H. Flynn, Nicole Grossberg, Barry L. Lefer and Rodney J. Weber

      Version of Record online: 12 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD017908

      Key Points

      • Contrasting WSOC gas/particle partitioning was observed in Atlanta and LA
      • Different VOC mixtures between the two environments are likely the cause
      • Provided evidence of SOA formation through an equilibrium partitioning process
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      Measurements of ocean derived aerosol off the coast of California

      T. S. Bates, P. K. Quinn, A. A. Frossard, L. M. Russell, J. Hakala, T. Petäjä, M. Kulmala, D. S. Covert, C. D. Cappa, S.-M. Li, K. L. Hayden, I. Nuaaman, R. McLaren, P. Massoli, M. R. Canagaratna, T. B. Onasch, D. Sueper, D. R. Worsnop and W. C. Keene

      Version of Record online: 29 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD017588

      Key Points

      • The ocean is a source of sub 100nm particles to the atmosphere
      • Hygroscopically the particles behave like an internal mixture of sea salt/organic
      • Organic mass fraction did not correlate with chlorophyll
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      Black carbon aerosol over the Los Angeles Basin during CalNex

      A. R. Metcalf, J. S. Craven, J. J. Ensberg, J. Brioude, W. Angevine, A. Sorooshian, H. T. Duong, H. H. Jonsson, R. C. Flagan and J. H. Seinfeld

      Version of Record online: 20 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD017255

      Key Points

      • Black carbon aerosol levels in the Los Angeles Basin are reported for May, 2010
      • Coatings on BC aerosol are likely organics and increase with plume age
      • Detailed analysis of the BC mixing state reveal two size modes in the LA Basin
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      Hygroscopicity and composition of California CCN during summer 2010

      R. H. Moore, K. Cerully, R. Bahreini, C. A. Brock, A. M. Middlebrook and A. Nenes

      Version of Record online: 3 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD017352

      Key Points

      • Hygroscopicity varied little during the period
      • The hygroscopicity is characteristic of aged organics
      • Mixing state and composition simplifications lead to 35-75% CCN overprediction
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      Evolution of aerosol properties impacting visibility and direct climate forcing in an ammonia-rich urban environment

      Justin M. Langridge, Daniel Lack, Charles A. Brock, Roya Bahreini, Ann M. Middlebrook, J. Andrew Neuman, John B. Nowak, Anne E. Perring, Joshua P. Schwarz, J. Ryan Spackman, John S. Holloway, Ilana B. Pollack, Thomas B. Ryerson, James M. Roberts, Carsten Warneke, Joost A. de Gouw, Michael K. Trainer and Daniel M. Murphy

      Version of Record online: 31 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD017116

      Key Points

      • The visibility and climate impacts of aerosol change with aging
      • Ammonium nitrate formation/partitioning is important in the Los Angeles region
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      Nanoparticle chemical composition and diurnal dependence at the CalNex Los Angeles ground site

      M. Ross Pennington, Joseph P. Klems, Bryan R. Bzdek and Murray V. Johnston

      Version of Record online: 15 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD017061

      Key Points

      • Abrupt increase in nanoparticle number concentration during the afternoon
      • Nanoparticles contain enhanced sulfur and silicon during the afternoon
      • Composition changes suggest photo-processing of primary vehicle emissions.
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      Observations of ozone transport from the free troposphere to the Los Angeles basin

      J. A. Neuman, M. Trainer, K. C. Aikin, W. M. Angevine, J. Brioude, S. S. Brown, J. A. de Gouw, W. P. Dube, J. H. Flynn, M. Graus, J. S. Holloway, B. L. Lefer, P. Nedelec, J. B. Nowak, D. D. Parrish, I. B. Pollack, J. M. Roberts, T. B. Ryerson, H. Smit, V. Thouret and N. L. Wagner

      Version of Record online: 9 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016919

      Key Points

      • Air mass chemical composition over Los Angeles Basin measured from aircraft
      • Upper tropospheric influence increased ozone in the lower free troposphere
      • Downward mixing of ozone-rich air increased ozone in California
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      Formation and growth of ultrafine particles from secondary sources in Bakersfield, California

      Lars Ahlm, Shang Liu, Douglas A. Day, Lynn M. Russell, Robin Weber, Drew R. Gentner, Allen H. Goldstein, Josh P. DiGangi, Samuel B. Henry, Frank N. Keutsch, Trevor C. VandenBoer, Milos Z. Markovic, Jennifer G. Murphy, Xinrong Ren and Scott Scheller

      Version of Record online: 7 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD017144

      Key Points

      • Ultrafine particle growth events were dominated by organic components
      • Particle number concentration was controlled by new particle formation
      • Ultrafine particles mass was correlated with formaldehyde and glyoxal
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      Transport of Asian ozone pollution into surface air over the western United States in spring

      Meiyun Lin, Arlene M. Fiore, Larry W. Horowitz, Owen R. Cooper, Vaishali Naik, John Holloway, Bryan J. Johnson, Ann M. Middlebrook, Samuel J. Oltmans, Ilana B. Pollack, Tomas B. Ryerson, Juying X. Warner, Christine Wiedinmyer, John Wilson and Bruce Wyman

      Version of Record online: 17 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016961

      Key Points

      • Using a high-resolution global chemistry-climate model and observations
      • Asian pollution contributes to high-O3 events in western U.S. surface air
      • Develop a space-based indicator to inform Asian influence on U.S. surface O3
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      Stratospheric influence on surface ozone in the Los Angeles area during late spring and early summer of 2010

      A. O. Langford, J. Brioude, O. R. Cooper, C. J. Senff, R. J. Alvarez II, R. M. Hardesty, B. J. Johnson and S. J. Oltmans

      Version of Record online: 4 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016766

      Key Points

      • Stratosphere-troposphere transport can influence surface ozone
      • Background ozone must be considered in urban areas
      • Transport cannot be neglected in air quality studies
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      Airborne and ground-based observations of a weekend effect in ozone, precursors, and oxidation products in the California South Coast Air Basin

      I. B. Pollack, T. B. Ryerson, M. Trainer, D. D. Parrish, A. E. Andrews, E. L. Atlas, D. R. Blake, S. S. Brown, R. Commane, B. C. Daube, J. A. de Gouw, W. P. Dubé, J. Flynn, G. J. Frost, J. B. Gilman, N. Grossberg, J. S. Holloway, J. Kofler, E. A. Kort, W. C. Kuster, P. M. Lang, B. Lefer, R. A. Lueb, J. A. Neuman, J. B. Nowak, P. C. Novelli, J. Peischl, A. E. Perring, J. M. Roberts, G. Santoni, J. P. Schwarz, J. R. Spackman, N. L. Wagner, C. Warneke, R. A. Washenfelder, S. C. Wofsy and B. Xiang

      Version of Record online: 1 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016772

      Key Points

      • A weekend ozone effect is observed in the South Coast Air Basin
      • Reductions in NOx emissions drive weekday and weekend differences in ozone
      • Photochemical ozone production contributes to observed weekend ozone levels
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      Measurement of western U.S. baseline ozone from the surface to the tropopause and assessment of downwind impact regions

      O. R. Cooper, S. J. Oltmans, B. J. Johnson, J. Brioude, W. Angevine, M. Trainer, D. D. Parrish, T. R. Ryerson, I. Pollack, P. D. Cullis, M. A. Ives, D. W. Tarasick, J. Al-Saadi and I. Stajner

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016095

      Key Points

      • Tropospheric baseline ozone was measured at four sites along the US west coast
      • 8–10% of the tropospheric baseline ozone impacts the surface of the western USA
      • Estimates of O3 production within California were made purely from observations
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      Water-soluble organic aerosol in the Los Angeles Basin and outflow regions: Airborne and ground measurements during the 2010 CalNex field campaign

      Hanh T. Duong, Armin Sorooshian, Jill S. Craven, Scott P. Hersey, Andrew R. Metcalf, Xiaolu Zhang, Rodney J. Weber, Haflidi Jonsson, Richard C. Flagan and John H. Seinfeld

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016674

      Key Points

      • WSOC is a major component of aerosol in the Los Angeles Basin and outflows
      • WSOC levels are enhanced aloft, especially with conditions of higher RH
      • The volatile nature of WSOC is discussed relative to other species
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      The glyoxal budget and its contribution to organic aerosol for Los Angeles, California, during CalNex 2010

      R. A. Washenfelder, C. J. Young, S. S. Brown, W. M. Angevine, E. L. Atlas, D. R. Blake, D. M. Bon, M. J. Cubison, J. A. de Gouw, S. Dusanter, J. Flynn, J. B. Gilman, M. Graus, S. Griffith, N. Grossberg, P. L. Hayes, J. L. Jimenez, W. C. Kuster, B. L. Lefer, I. B. Pollack, T. B. Ryerson, H. Stark, P. S. Stevens and M. K. Trainer

      Version of Record online: 28 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016314

      Key Points

      • We used a new field instrument to measure glyoxal in Los Angeles during 2010
      • We constrain glyoxal contribution to aerosol using three methods
      • During daytime, glyoxal contributes 0–4% of secondary organic aerosol mass
  3. Regular Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Aerosol and Clouds
    3. Composition and Chemistry
    4. Regular Articles
    5. Research Articles
    1. Aerosol and Clouds

      You have free access to this content
      Organic aerosol composition and sources in Pasadena, California, during the 2010 CalNex campaign (pages 9233–9257)

      P. L. Hayes, A. M. Ortega, M. J. Cubison, K. D. Froyd, Y. Zhao, S. S. Cliff, W. W. Hu, D. W. Toohey, J. H. Flynn, B. L. Lefer, N. Grossberg, S. Alvarez, B. Rappenglück, J. W. Taylor, J. D. Allan, J. S. Holloway, J. B. Gilman, W. C. Kuster, J. A. de Gouw, P. Massoli, X. Zhang, J. Liu, R. J. Weber, A. L. Corrigan, L. M. Russell, G. Isaacman, D. R. Worton, N. M. Kreisberg, A. H. Goldstein, R. Thalman, E. M. Waxman, R. Volkamer, Y. H. Lin, J. D. Surratt, T. E. Kleindienst, J. H. Offenberg, S. Dusanter, S. Griffith, P. S. Stevens, J. Brioude, W. M. Angevine and J. L. Jimenez

      Version of Record online: 29 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50530

      Key Points

      • For the same photochemical ages, SOA to CO ratios do not display a weekly cycle
      • Organic aerosol is apportioned into five components using PMF
      • SOA formation/evolution is similar for several urban locations
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      Gas/particle partitioning of total alkyl nitrates observed with TD-LIF in Bakersfield (pages 6651–6662)

      A. W. Rollins, S. Pusede, P. Wooldridge, K.-E. Min, D. R. Gentner, A. H. Goldstein, S. Liu, D. A. Day, L. M. Russell, C. L. Rubitschun, J. D. Surratt and R. C. Cohen

      Version of Record online: 26 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50522

      Key Points

      • 21% of alkyl and multifunctional organic nitrates are in the condensed phase.
      • Absorptive partitioning impacts gas/particle partitioning.
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      Changes of ns-soot mixing states and shapes in an urban area during CalNex (pages 3723–3730)

      Kouji Adachi and Peter R. Buseck

      Version of Record online: 13 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50321

      Key Points

      • Ns-soot particles have a wide range of shapes, mixing states, and abundances
      • Shapes and mixing states of ns-soot vary within several hours
      • Aerosol particles attached to soot hardly affect its light absorption
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      Droplet activation properties of organic aerosols observed at an urban site during CalNex-LA (pages 2903–2917)

      Fan Mei, Patrick L. Hayes, Amber Ortega, Jonathan W. Taylor, James D. Allan, Jessica Gilman, William Kuster, Joost de Gouw, Jose L. Jimenez and Jian Wang

      Version of Record online: 11 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50285

      Key Points

      • Organic hygroscopicity increases with increasing oxidation level
      • Hydrophobic particles are rapidly converted to hydrophilic ones through aging
      • Greater increase of organic hygroscopicity with O:C based on field measurements
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      Inorganic and black carbon aerosols in the Los Angeles Basin during CalNex (pages 1777–1803)

      J. J. Ensberg, J. S. Craven, A. R. Metcalf, J. D. Allan, W. M. Angevine, R. Bahreini, J. Brioude, C. Cai, H. Coe, J. A. de Gouw, R. A. Ellis, J. H. Flynn, C. L. Haman, P. L. Hayes, J. L. Jimenez, B. L. Lefer, A. M. Middlebrook, J. G. Murphy, J. A. Neuman, J. B. Nowak, J. M. Roberts, J. Stutz, J. W. Taylor, P. R. Veres, J. M. Walker and J. H. Seinfeld

      Version of Record online: 19 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018136

      Key points

      • We measured inorganic gas- and aerosol-phase species during CalNex
      • We compare ground-based and airborne measurements to CMAQ predictions
      • Measure/model agreement varies depending on the species and location
    6. Climate and Dynamics

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      Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from California based on 2010 CalNex airborne measurements (pages 2809–2820)

      Bin Xiang, Scot M. Miller, Eric A. Kort, Gregory W. Santoni, Bruce C. Daube, Roisin Commane, Wayne M. Angevine, Tom B. Ryerson, Michael K. Trainer, Arlyn E. Andrews, Thomas Nehrkorn, Hanqin Tian and Steven C. Wofsy

      Version of Record online: 11 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50189

      Key Points

      • Bottom-up N2O inventories have erroneous spatial information.
      • Agriculture is the dominant N2O source in California Central Valley.
      • Estimated annual state emissions are 1~2 times higher than inventory values.
    7. Composition and Chemistry

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      Impact of Southern California anthropogenic emissions on ozone pollution in the mountain states: Model analysis and observational evidence from space (pages 12,784–12,803)

      Min Huang, Kevin W. Bowman, Gregory R. Carmichael, R. Bradley Pierce, Helen M. Worden, Ming Luo, Owen R. Cooper, Ilana B. Pollack, Thomas B. Ryerson and Steven S. Brown

      Version of Record online: 26 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JD020205

      Key Points

      • SoCal anthropogenic pollution is exported to the mountain states
      • Dynamical and chemical coupling of O3 from Asia, stratosphere and SoCal
      • Satellite detection of pollution transport on different scales
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      Los Angeles Basin airborne organic aerosol characterization during CalNex (pages 11,453–11,467)

      J. S. Craven, A. R. Metcalf, R. Bahreini, A. Middlebrook, P. L. Hayes, H. T. Duong, A. Sorooshian, J. L. Jimenez, R. C. Flagan and J. H. Seinfeld

      Version of Record online: 15 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50853

      Key Points

      • Airborne organic aerosol measurements over LA are reported
      • Spatial pattern of O:C depends on amount of organic aerosol present
      • PMF factors are correlated with two modes of rBC containing aerosol
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      Sources of organic aerosol investigated using organic compounds as tracers measured during CalNex in Bakersfield (pages 11,388–11,398)

      Yunliang Zhao, Nathan M. Kreisberg, David R. Worton, Gabriel Isaacman, Drew R. Gentner, Arthur W. H. Chan, Robin J. Weber, Shang Liu, Douglas A. Day, Lynn M. Russell, Susanne V. Hering and Allen H. Goldstein

      Version of Record online: 4 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50825

      Key Points

      • SOA was the dominant component of OA, and four types of SOA were identified
      • Both regional and local SOA were significant contributors to OA
      • the formation of SOA was mainly through gas-to-particle condensation
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      Heterogeneous formation of nitryl chloride and its role as a nocturnal NOx reservoir species during CalNex-LA 2010 (pages 10,638–10,652)

      L. H. Mielke, J. Stutz, C. Tsai, S. C. Hurlock, J. M. Roberts, P. R. Veres, K. D. Froyd, P. L. Hayes, M. J. Cubison, J. L. Jimenez, R. A. Washenfelder, C. J. Young, J. B. Gilman, J. A. de Gouw, J. H. Flynn, N. Grossberg, B. L. Lefer, J. Liu, R. J. Weber and H. D. Osthoff

      Version of Record online: 24 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50783

      Key Points

      • We present field measurements of ClNO2 during Calnex-LA 2010.
      • ClNO2 was a more significant nocturnal NOx and Ox reservoir than N2O5.
      • Rates of N2O5 to ClNO2 conversion varied between nights.
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      Spatial and diurnal variability in reactive nitrogen oxide chemistry as reflected in the isotopic composition of atmospheric nitrate: Results from the CalNex 2010 field study (pages 10,567–10,588)

      W. C. Vicars, S. Morin, J. Savarino, N. L. Wagner, J. Erbland, E. Vince, J. M. F. Martins, B. M. Lerner, P. K. Quinn, D. J. Coffman, E. J. Williams and S. S. Brown

      Version of Record online: 17 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50680

      Key Points

      • Stable isotope ratios of atmospheric nitrate were measured in coastal California
      • Oxygen isotopes are interpreted in terms of production mechanisms
      • Nitrogen isotopic composition reflects both sources and isotopic exchange
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      Carbonyl sulfide in the planetary boundary layer: Coastal and continental influences (pages 8001–8009)

      R. Commane, S. C. Herndon, M. S. Zahniser, B. M. Lerner, J. B. McManus, J. W. Munger, D. D. Nelson and S. C. Wofsy

      Version of Record online: 22 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50581

      Key Points

      • Newly constructed laser-based absorption system measuring OCS and CO2 at 1 Hz
      • Photosynthetic uptake, nighttime deposition and wetland emission of OCS observed
      • OCS/CO2 relationship complex to interpret in some heterogeneous ecosystems
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      Airborne MAX-DOAS measurements over California: Testing the NASA OMI tropospheric NO2 product (pages 7400–7413)

      Hilke Oetjen, Sunil Baidar, Nickolay A. Krotkov, Lok N. Lamsal, Michael Lechner and Rainer Volkamer

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50550

      Key Points

      • Airborne and OMI satellite NO2 VCD compare within 12%
      • Agreement applies over high surface albedo and summer in California
      • Reduction in NO2 VCD during weekends is highly significant
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      Detailed chemical characterization of unresolved complex mixtures in atmospheric organics: Insights into emission sources, atmospheric processing, and secondary organic aerosol formation (pages 6783–6796)

      Arthur W. H. Chan, Gabriel Isaacman, Kevin R. Wilson, David R. Worton, Christopher R. Ruehl, Theodora Nah, Drew R. Gentner, Timothy R. Dallmann, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, Robert A. Harley, Jessica B. Gilman, William C. Kuster, Joost A. de Gouw, John H. Offenberg, Tadeusz E. Kleindienst, Ying H. Lin, Caitlin L. Rubitschun, Jason D. Surratt, Patrick L. Hayes, Jose L. Jimenez and Allen H. Goldstein

      Version of Record online: 25 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50533

      Key Points

      • Previously unresolved organics are characterized by molecular structures.
      • Branched alkanes play an important role in oxidation of SVOCs to form SOA.
      • Composition of UCM provides constraints on rate of atmospheric processing.
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      Pollutant transport among California regions (pages 6750–6763)

      Wayne M. Angevine, Jerome Brioude, Stuart McKeen, John S. Holloway, Brian M. Lerner, Allen H. Goldstein, Abhinav Guha, Arlyn Andrews, John B. Nowak, Stephanie Evan, Marc L. Fischer, Jessica B. Gilman and Daniel Bon

      Version of Record online: 20 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50490

      Key Points

      • WRF/FLEXPART is used to describe transport patterns in California
      • Tracer age (time since emission) is shown
      • Southern California and the Bay Area influence air in the Southern California Bight
    16. You have free access to this content
      Trends in ozone, its precursors, and related secondary oxidation products in Los Angeles, California: A synthesis of measurements from 1960 to 2010 (pages 5893–5911)

      Ilana B. Pollack, Thomas B. Ryerson, Michael Trainer, J. A. Neuman, James M. Roberts and David D. Parrish

      Version of Record online: 13 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50472

      Key Points

      • O3 reductions result from decreasing VOC and NOx abundances and VOC/NOx ratio
      • Oxidation products show no detectable trend in ozone production efficiency
      • Increased NOx oxidation rates increasingly favor HNO3 production over time
    17. You have free access to this content
      The 2010 California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) field study (pages 5830–5866)

      T. B. Ryerson, A. E. Andrews, W. M. Angevine, T. S. Bates, C. A. Brock, B. Cairns, R. C. Cohen, O. R. Cooper, J. A. de Gouw, F. C. Fehsenfeld, R. A. Ferrare, M. L. Fischer, R. C. Flagan, A. H. Goldstein, J. W. Hair, R. M. Hardesty, C. A. Hostetler, J. L. Jimenez, A. O. Langford, E. McCauley, S. A. McKeen, L. T. Molina, A. Nenes, S. J. Oltmans, D. D. Parrish, J. R. Pederson, R. B. Pierce, K. Prather, P. K. Quinn, J. H. Seinfeld, C. J. Senff, A. Sorooshian, J. Stutz, J. D. Surratt, M. Trainer, R. Volkamer, E. J. Williams and S. C. Wofsy

      Version of Record online: 13 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50331

      Key Points

      • An overview of the multi-platform, multi-agency CalNex field study in 2010
      • A synthesis of CalNex research to date
      • Emphasis on policy-relevant conclusions linking climate and air quality issues
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      Photochemical aging of volatile organic compounds in the Los Angeles basin: Weekday-weekend effect (pages 5018–5028)

      Carsten Warneke, Joost A. de Gouw, Peter M. Edwards, John S. Holloway, Jessica B. Gilman, William C. Kuster, Martin Graus, Elliot Atlas, Don Blake, Drew R. Gentner, Allen H. Goldstein, Robert A. Harley, Sergio Alvarez, Bernhard Rappenglueck, Michael Trainer and David D. Parrish

      Version of Record online: 29 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50423

      Key Points

      • Spatial and temporal photochemical processing in Los Angeles
      • VOC weekday-weekend effect
      • Faster photochemistry in weekends
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      Quantifying sources of methane using light alkanes in the Los Angeles basin, California (pages 4974–4990)

      J. Peischl, T. B. Ryerson, J. Brioude, K. C. Aikin, A. E. Andrews, E. Atlas, D. Blake, B. C. Daube, J. A. de Gouw, E. Dlugokencky, G. J. Frost, D. R. Gentner, J. B. Gilman, A. H. Goldstein, R. A. Harley, J. S. Holloway, J. Kofler, W. C. Kuster, P. M. Lang, P. C. Novelli, G. W. Santoni, M. Trainer, S. C. Wofsy and D. D. Parrish

      Version of Record online: 28 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50413

      Key Points

      • Top-down estimates of CH4 emissions in L.A. are greater than inventory estimates
      • Estimates of CH4 emissions from landfills in L.A. agree with CARB inventory
      • Pipeline natural gas and/or seeps, and landfills are main sources of CH4 in L.A.
    20. You have free access to this content
      The impact of shipping, agricultural, and urban emissions on single particle chemistry observed aboard the R/V Atlantis during CalNex (pages 5003–5017)

      Cassandra J. Gaston, Patricia K. Quinn, Timothy S. Bates, Jessica B. Gilman, Daniel M. Bon, William C. Kuster and Kimberly A. Prather

      Version of Record online: 28 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50427

      Key Points

      • Southern California was dominated by soot containing particles
      • Northern California was dominated by organic carbon particles
      • Particle mixing-state was heavily influenced by meteorological conditions
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      Composition and hygroscopicity of the Los Angeles Aerosol: CalNex (pages 3016–3036)

      Scott P. Hersey, Jill S. Craven, Andrew R. Metcalf, Jack Lin, Terry Lathem, Kaitlyn J. Suski, John F. Cahill, Hanh T. Duong, Armin Sorooshian, Haflidi H. Jonsson, Manabu Shiraiwa, Andreas Zuend, Athanasios Nenes, Kimberly A. Prather, Richard C. Flagan and John H. Seinfeld

      Version of Record online: 11 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50307

      Key Points

      • Aged aerosol is internally mixed; organics and nitrate coat all particle types
      • Aged particles exhibit suppressed subsaturated k but enhanced CCN activity
      • Organic coatings inhibit subsaturated water uptake but not CCN activity
    22. You have free access to this content
      Emission ratios of anthropogenic volatile organic compounds in northern mid-latitude megacities: Observations versus emission inventories in Los Angeles and Paris (pages 2041–2057)

      Agnes Borbon, J. B. Gilman, W. C. Kuster, N. Grand, S. Chevaillier, A. Colomb, C. Dolgorouky, V. Gros, M. Lopez, R. Sarda-Esteve, J. Holloway, J. Stutz, H. Petetin, S. McKeen, M. Beekmann, C. Warneke, D. D. Parrish and J. A. de Gouw

      Version of Record online: 27 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50059

      Key Points

      • Urban VOC emission ratios are compared in two modern megacities
      • Gasoline-powered vehicles emissions are still the dominant VOC urban source
      • Observations/inventory differences are <40% in terms of OH-reactvity and SOAP
    23. You have free access to this content
      Emission estimates of HCFCs and HFCs in California from the 2010 CalNex study (pages 2019–2030)

      Barbara Barletta, Marc Carreras-Sospedra, Alex Cohan, Paul Nissenson, Donald Dabdub, Simone Meinardi, Elliot Atlas, Rich Lueb, John S. Holloway, Thomas B. Ryerson, James Pederson, Richard A. VanCuren and Donald R. Blake

      Version of Record online: 25 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50209

      Key Points

      • HCFC and HFC emissions are calculated for the year 2010 for the SoCAB
      • Emissions are extrapolated to the state of California
      • Emissions are calculated using CalNex field measurements
    24. You have free access to this content
      Probing molecular associations of field-collected and laboratory-generated SOA with nano-DESI high-resolution mass spectrometry (pages 1042–1051)

      Rachel E. O'Brien, Tran B. Nguyen, Alexander Laskin, Julia Laskin, Patrick L. Hayes, Shang Liu, Jose L. Jimenez, Lynn M. Russell, Sergey A. Nizkorodov and Allen H. Goldstein

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50119

      Key Points

      • The composition of SOA from CalNex sites and from chamber studies are compared.
  4. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Aerosol and Clouds
    3. Composition and Chemistry
    4. Regular Articles
    5. Research Articles
    1. Composition and Chemistry

      You have free access to this content
      Observations of gas phase hydrochloric acid in the polluted marine boundary layer (pages 6897–6915)

      Timia A. Crisp, Brian M. Lerner, Eric J. Williams, Patricia K. Quinn, Timothy S. Bates and Timothy H. Bertram

      Version of Record online: 10 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JD020992

      Key Points

      • Measurements of HCl in the polluted MBL with novel instrumentation
      • Investigations of Cl atom production rates from HCl
      • Investigation of gas- to particulate-phase partitioning
    2. You have free access to this content
      Measurements and modeling of the inorganic chemical composition of fine particulate matter and associated precursor gases in California's San Joaquin Valley during CalNex 2010 (pages 6853–6866)

      M. Z. Markovic, T. C. VandenBoer, K. R. Baker, J. T. Kelly and J. G. Murphy

      Version of Record online: 5 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JD021408

      Key Points

      • Ammonia is abundant in the SJV and has a strong temperature dependence
      • Nitric acid is very low in the SJV and limits summer PM2.5 formation
      • The CMAQ model is biased for pSO42−, gas phase NH3, and total nitrate in the SJV
    3. You have free access to this content
      Diurnal cycle of fossil and nonfossil carbon using radiocarbon analyses during CalNex (pages 6818–6835)

      Peter Zotter, Imad El-Haddad, Yanlin Zhang, Patrick L. Hayes, Xiaolu Zhang, Ying-Hsuan Lin, Lukas Wacker, Jürgen Schnelle-Kreis, Gülcin Abbaszade, Ralf Zimmermann, Jason D. Surratt, Rodney Weber, José L. Jimenez, Sönke Szidat, Urs Baltensperger and André S. H. Prévôt

      Version of Record online: 3 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JD021114

      Key Points

      • Nonfossil carbon concentrations in Pasadena are constant throughout the day
      • Fossil afternoon increase after arrival of the western Los Angeles basin plume
      • Fossil increase is mainly due to fresh SOA formed in the LA basin plume
    4. You have free access to this content
      Fine-scale simulation of ammonium and nitrate over the South Coast Air Basin and San Joaquin Valley of California during CalNex-2010 (pages 3600–3614)

      James T. Kelly, Kirk R. Baker, John B. Nowak, Jennifer G. Murphy, Milos Z. Markovic, Trevor C. VandenBoer, Raluca A. Ellis, J. Andrew Neuman, Rodney J. Weber, James M. Roberts, Patrick R. Veres, Joost A. de Gouw, Melinda R. Beaver, Sally Newman and Chris Misenis

      Version of Record online: 28 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JD021290

      Key Points

      • Broad spatial patterns of 24 h average nitrate are simulated well
      • Underprediction of sodium limits partitioning of nitrate to particles in LA
      • Nocturnal nitrate production is impacted by modeling of evening PBL transition
    5. You have free access to this content
      An investigation of ammonia and inorganic particulate matter in California during the CalNex campaign (pages 1883–1902)

      Luke D. Schiferl, Colette L. Heald, John B. Nowak, John S. Holloway, J. Andrew Neuman, Roya Bahreini, Ilana B. Pollack, Thomas B. Ryerson, Christine Wiedinmyer and Jennifer G. Murphy

      Version of Record online: 24 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JD020765

      Key Points

      • Simulate effects of ammonia and fine PM formation on surface air quality
      • Increasing livestock ammonia emissions reduces bias throughout California
      • Surface PM peaks in winter in Central Valley with summer peak near LA

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