Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres


  1. Introduction to a Special Collection

    1. Top of page
    2. Introduction to a Special Collection
    3. Regular Articles
    4. Research Articles
    1. Climate and Dynamics

      An overview of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) (pages 13,103–13,107)

      Ben Kravitz, Alan Robock, Piers M. Forster, James M. Haywood, Mark G. Lawrence and Hauke Schmidt

      Article first published online: 12 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JD020569

      Key Points

      • GeoMIP has been quite successful with 13 models participating
      • Three new experiments on marine cloud brightening are planned
      • GeoMIP has improved understanding and highlighted research gaps
  2. Regular Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Introduction to a Special Collection
    3. Regular Articles
    4. Research Articles
    1. Aerosol and Clouds

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Sea-salt injections into the low-latitude marine boundary layer: The transient response in three Earth system models (pages 12,195–12,206)

      Kari Alterskjær, Jón Egill Kristjánsson, Olivier Boucher, Helene Muri, Ulrike Niemeier, Hauke Schmidt, Michael Schulz and Claudia Timmreck

      Article first published online: 14 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JD020432

      Key Points

      • This is the first multi-ESM study of sea salt climate engineering
      • Over the low-latitude continents all models find a reduction in aridity
      • Terminating climate engineering leads to Arctic warming exceeding 1 K / decade
    2. Sea spray geoengineering experiments in the geoengineering model intercomparison project (GeoMIP): Experimental design and preliminary results (pages 11,175–11,186)

      Ben Kravitz, Piers M. Forster, Andy Jones, Alan Robock, Kari Alterskjær, Olivier Boucher, Annabel K. L. Jenkins, Hannele Korhonen, Jón Egill Kristjánsson, Helene Muri, Ulrike Niemeier, Antti-Ilari Partanen, Philip J. Rasch, Hailong Wang and Shingo Watanabe

      Article first published online: 4 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50856

      Key Points

      • Outline of three marine cloud brightening experiments
      • Land-sea contrast is an important feature of marine cloud brightening
      • Direct effect of sea salt injection may be greater than indirect effect
    3. Climate and Dynamics

      An energetic perspective on hydrological cycle changes in the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (pages 13,087–13,102)

      Ben Kravitz, Philip J. Rasch, Piers M. Forster, Timothy Andrews, Jason N. S. Cole, Peter J. Irvine, Duoying Ji, Jón Egill Kristjánsson, John C. Moore, Helene Muri, Ulrike Niemeier, Alan Robock, Balwinder Singh, Simone Tilmes, Shingo Watanabe and Jin-Ho Yoon

      Article first published online: 11 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JD020502

      Key Points

      • Geoengineering feedback response is small
      • Geoengineering can limit ocean heat uptake in a high CO2 climate
      • Annual mean circulation changes under geoengineering may be small
    4. Solar irradiance reduction via climate engineering: Impact of different techniques on the energy balance and the hydrological cycle (pages 11,905–11,917)

      U. Niemeier, H. Schmidt, K. Alterskjær and J. E. Kristjánsson

      Article first published online: 7 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JD020445

      Key Points

      • First comparison of climate impacts of three climate engineering techniques
      • Global precipitation decreases with all CE methods but differs between methods
      • Impact on tropical dynamics depends on SRM method
    5. The hydrological impact of geoengineering in the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) (pages 11,036–11,058)

      Simone Tilmes, John Fasullo, Jean-Francois Lamarque, Daniel R. Marsh, Michael Mills, Kari Alterskjær, Helene Muri, Jón E. Kristjánsson, Olivier Boucher, Michael Schulz, Jason N. S. Cole, Charles L. Curry, Andy Jones, Jim Haywood, Peter J. Irvine, Duoying Ji, John C. Moore, Diana B. Karam, Ben Kravitz, Philip J. Rasch, Balwinder Singh, Jin-Ho Yoon, Ulrike Niemeier, Hauke Schmidt, Alan Robock, Shuting Yang and Shingo Watanabe

      Article first published online: 15 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50868

      Key Points

      • Geoengineering leads to a weakening of the hydrologic cycle
      • Evapotranspiration changes important for initial reduction of precipitation
      • Considerable reduction of monsoonal precipitation over land with SRM
    6. The impact of abrupt suspension of solar radiation management (termination effect) in experiment G2 of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) (pages 9743–9752)

      Andy Jones, Jim M. Haywood, Kari Alterskjær, Olivier Boucher, Jason N. S. Cole, Charles L. Curry, Peter J. Irvine, Duoying Ji, Ben Kravitz, Jón Egill Kristjánsson, John C. Moore, Ulrike Niemeier, Alan Robock, Hauke Schmidt, Balwinder Singh, Simone Tilmes, Shingo Watanabe and Jin-Ho Yoon

      Article first published online: 11 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50762

      Key Points

      • Impacts of the abrupt termination of geoengineering are compared in 11 GCMs
      • The models agree on very rapid global-mean warming following termination
      • Levels of agreement vary on the geographic patterns of climatic change
    7. Climate model response from the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) (pages 8320–8332)

      Ben Kravitz, Ken Caldeira, Olivier Boucher, Alan Robock, Philip J. Rasch, Kari Alterskjær, Diana Bou Karam, Jason N. S. Cole, Charles L. Curry, James M. Haywood, Peter J. Irvine, Duoying Ji, Andy Jones, Jón Egill Kristjánsson, Daniel J. Lunt, John C. Moore, Ulrike Niemeier, Hauke Schmidt, Michael Schulz, Balwinder Singh, Simone Tilmes, Shingo Watanabe, Shuting Yang and Jin-Ho Yoon

      Article first published online: 9 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50646

      Key Points

      • Temperature reduction from uniform geoengineering is not uniform
      • Geoengineering cannot offset both temperature and hydrology changes
      • NPP increases mostly due to CO2 fertilization
  3. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Introduction to a Special Collection
    3. Regular Articles
    4. Research Articles
    1. Climate and Dynamics

      Solar radiation management impacts on agriculture in China: A case study in the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) (pages 8695–8711)

      Lili Xia, Alan Robock, Jason Cole, Charles L. Curry, Duoying Ji, Andy Jones, Ben Kravitz, John C. Moore, Helene Muri, Ulrike Niemeier, Balwinder Singh, Simone Tilmes, Shingo Watanabe and Jin-Ho Yoon

      Article first published online: 25 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JD020630

      Key Points

      • Geoengineering causes Chinese rice production to fall and maize production to rise
      • Without CO2 fertilization, G2 rice production drops 11.6 Mt/a and maize rises 10.4 Mt/a
      • Both temperature and rainfall changes are important for the rice and maize production
    2. Key factors governing uncertainty in the response to sunshade geoengineering from a comparison of the GeoMIP ensemble and a perturbed parameter ensemble (pages 7946–7962)

      Peter J. Irvine, Olivier Boucher, Ben Kravitz, Kari Alterskjær, Jason N. S. Cole, Duoying Ji, Andy Jones, Daniel J. Lunt, John C. Moore, Helene Muri, Ulrike Niemeier, Alan Robock, Balwinder Singh, Simone Tilmes, Shingo Watanabe, Shuting Yang and Jin-Ho Yoon

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JD020716

      Key Points

      • Similar solar geoengineering climate response for GeoMIP and a PPE of HadCM3
      • Undercooling and overcooling do not explain ensemble hydrological differences
      • Key uncertainties identified: piControl biases and CO2 physiological response
    3. Forcings and feedbacks in the GeoMIP ensemble for a reduction in solar irradiance and increase in CO2 (pages 5226–5239)

      Nicolas Huneeus, Olivier Boucher, Kari Alterskjær, Jason N. S. Cole, Charles L. Curry, Duoying Ji, Andy Jones, Ben Kravitz, Jón Egill Kristjánsson, John C. Moore, Helene Muri, Ulrike Niemeier, Phil Rasch, Alan Robock, Balwinder Singh, Hauke Schmidt, Michael Schulz, Simone Tilmes, Shingo Watanabe and Jin-Ho Yoon

      Article first published online: 9 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JD021110

      Key Points

      • Analysis of 10 ESMs focusing on energy balance at the TOA and surface
      • Climate feedback's distribution is almost identical for both forcing mechanisms
      • ERF at the TOA suggest a rapid cloud adjustment to change in solar irradiance
    4. A multimodel examination of climate extremes in an idealized geoengineering experiment (pages 3900–3923)

      Charles L. Curry, Jana Sillmann, David Bronaugh, Kari Alterskjaer, Jason N. S. Cole, Duoying Ji, Ben Kravitz, Jón Egill Kristjánsson, John C. Moore, Helene Muri, Ulrike Niemeier, Alan Robock, Simone Tilmes and Shuting Yang

      Article first published online: 14 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JD020648

      Key Points

      • The G1 experiment features significant changes in climate extremes
      • Rapid climate responses in G1 lead to significant regional warming over land
      • Extreme temperatures decrease and cold spells increase over oceans in G1
    5. Arctic cryosphere response in the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project G3 and G4 scenarios (pages 1308–1321)

      Mira Berdahl, Alan Robock, Duoying Ji, John C. Moore, Andy Jones, Ben Kravitz and Shingo Watanabe

      Article first published online: 15 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JD020627

      Key Points

      • Sea ice extents decrease despite sulfate aerosol injection
      • Ice extents collapse back to RCP4.5 levels after geoengineering stops
      • Negative net radiative forcing is necessary to stop snow/sea ice melting
    6. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Arctic sea ice and atmospheric circulation under the GeoMIP G1 scenario (pages 567–583)

      John C. Moore, Annette Rinke, Xiaoyong Yu, Duoying Ji, Xuefeng Cui, Yan Li, Kari Alterskjær, Jón Egill Kristjánsson, Helene Muri, Olivier Boucher, Nicolas Huneeus, Ben Kravitz, Alan Robock, Ulrike Niemeier, Michael Schulz, Simone Tilmes, Shingo Watanabe and Shuting Yang

      Article first published online: 29 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JD021060

      Key Points

      • Analysis of eight ESM focused on Arctic sea ice and feedback
      • Response of Arctic to G1 geoengineering shows clear regional differences
      • Sea ice is far different in detail under G1 than in pre industrial
    7. Composition and Chemistry

      Stratospheric ozone response to sulfate geoengineering: Results from the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) (pages 2629–2653)

      Giovanni Pitari, Valentina Aquila, Ben Kravitz, Alan Robock, Shingo Watanabe, Irene Cionni, Natalia De Luca, Glauco Di Genova, Eva Mancini and Simone Tilmes

      Article first published online: 5 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JD020566

      Key Points

      • Different processes affect ozone in stratospheric sulfate aerosol geoengineering
      • Suppression of NOx cycle becomes more important than ClOx depleting cycle
      • Polar UV-B increases by 5% annually and 12% in spring

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