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There are 3544415 results for: content related to: Equarin, which is expressed in the equatorial region of the lens (top), plays important roles in lens cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion and migration (bottom). See Song et al. , 199–205.

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    Cover Photograph: Tool use-associated gene expressions and hypothetical scenario of cortical expansion in primate brain evolution (See Matsunaga et al., pp. 484–495).

    Development, Growth & Differentiation

    Volume 57, Issue 6, August 2015, Page: i,

    Version of Record online : 20 JUL 2015, DOI: 10.1111/dgd.12171

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    Changes in proliferation, differentiation, fibroblast growth factor 2 responsiveness and expression of syndecan-4 and glypican-1 with turkey satellite cell age

    Development, Growth & Differentiation

    Volume 55, Issue 5, June 2013, Pages: 622–634, Laura B. Harthan, Douglas C. McFarland and Sandra G. Velleman

    Version of Record online : 17 JUN 2013, DOI: 10.1111/dgd.12069

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    Zooidal senescence in budding tunicates accompanies increasing activity of senescence-associated galactosidase and decreasing activities of zooid growth and budding. Nuclear Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) and mitochondrial respiratory genes also attenuate during senescence. Knockdown of SOD1 by RNAi diminished the mitochondrial gene activity. The resultant zooids had defi ciencies in growth and budding without affecting galactosidase activity. See Kawamura and Sunanaga, 606–614.

    Development, Growth & Differentiation

    Volume 55, Issue 5, June 2013, Page: i,

    Version of Record online : 17 JUN 2013, DOI: 10.1111/dgd.12071

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    Differentiation of PZ5 neural stem/progenitor cells. PZ5 neural stem/progenitor cells that have multipotent ability to differentiate into neurons, astrocytes or oligodendrocytes were genetically engineered to express one of channelrhodopsin variants tagged with EGFP and allowed for differentiation for 12 days. Each color represents; βIII-tubulin (red, a marker of mature neurons), channelrhodopsin-EGFP (green, a marker of membrane) and DAPI (blue, a maker of nuclei). Some of them are fl at with an appearance of astrocyte where as others have neuron-line morphologies.

    Development, Growth & Differentiation

    Volume 56, Issue 8, October 2014, Page: i,

    Version of Record online : 15 OCT 2014, DOI: 10.1111/dgd.12086

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    Cover Photograph: Immunodetection of β integrin-LP-positive cells (green) in stomach and muscle (red) and ciliary systems (magenta) in mussel larva Mytilus trossulus (See Dyachuk et al., pp. 515–528).

    Development, Growth & Differentiation

    Volume 57, Issue 7, September 2015, Page: i,

    Version of Record online : 4 SEP 2015, DOI: 10.1111/dgd.12173

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    Cover Photograph: Immuno-staining of 4/32-cells. Dissociated 1/8-cells were cultured until they reach 4/32-cells. These formed small cell clusters resembling blastocyst. Cells surrounding the cyst expressed Cdx2 (red), but the expression of Nanog (green) did not show correlation with cellular position in the cyst.

    Development, Growth & Differentiation

    Volume 57, Issue 9, December 2015, Page: i,

    Version of Record online : 28 DEC 2015, DOI: 10.1111/dgd.12177

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    The posterior portion of early prepupal salivary gland of Drosophila melanogaster during tremendous endocytosis. Red is filamentous actin underlining cell membranes, blue is nuclear DNA, and green represents numerous acidic vacuoles in the cytoplasm. Small green endosomes tend to fuse quickly into large vacuoles. See Farkas et al.,74–96

    Development, Growth & Differentiation

    Volume 57, Issue 1, January 2015, Page: i,

    Version of Record online : 26 JAN 2015, DOI: 10.1111/dgd.12161

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    Cover Photograph: Xenopus spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) at telophase. Primary spermatogonium destined to differentiate and SSC are thought to arise from areas in which JAK1 mRNA (blue signals in the middle and right column) is present (arrowheads) and absent (double arrowheads), respectively. (See Hyakutake et al.)

    Development, Growth & Differentiation

    Volume 57, Issue 5, June 2015, Page: i,

    Version of Record online : 9 JUN 2015, DOI: 10.1111/dgd.12169

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    Skeletal pattern in various fish species. Bone (red) and cartilage (blue) were stained. Fish tail exhibits various morphology and is suitable model for evo-devo study. See Moriyama and Takeda, 687—698.

    Development, Growth & Differentiation

    Volume 55, Issue 8, October 2013, Page: i,

    Version of Record online : 11 OCT 2013, DOI: 10.1111/dgd.12095

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    Targeted genome editing

    Development, Growth & Differentiation

    Volume 56, Issue 1, January 2014, Page: 1, Takashi Yamamoto and Harukazu Nakamura

    Version of Record online : 21 JAN 2014, DOI: 10.1111/dgd.12120

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    Cell proliferation and development

    Development, Growth & Differentiation

    Volume 56, Issue 5, June 2014, Page: 323, Takashi Takeuchi and Harukazu Nakamura

    Version of Record online : 25 JUN 2014, DOI: 10.1111/dgd.12142

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    Vacuole dynamics in the salivary glands of Drosophila melanogaster during prepupal development

    Development, Growth & Differentiation

    Volume 57, Issue 1, January 2015, Pages: 74–96, Robert Farkaš, Denisa Beňová-Liszeková, Lucia Mentelová, Silvia Mahmood, Zuzana Ďatková, Milan Beňo, Ludmila Pečeňová, Otakar Raška, Jana Šmigová, Bruce A. Chase, Ivan Raška and Bernard M. Mechler

    Version of Record online : 22 JAN 2015, DOI: 10.1111/dgd.12193

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    Issue Information

    Development, Growth & Differentiation

    Volume 57, Issue 2, February 2015, Pages: ii–iii,

    Version of Record online : 26 FEB 2015, DOI: 10.1111/dgd.12164

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    Antagonistic and synergistic effects of bone morphogenetic protein 2/7 and all-trans retinoic acid on the osteogenic differentiation of rat bone marrow stromal cells

    Development, Growth & Differentiation

    Volume 55, Issue 9, December 2013, Pages: 744–754, Wenjuan Bi, Zhiyuan Gu, Yuanna Zheng, Limin Wang, Jing Guo and Gang Wu

    Version of Record online : 2 OCT 2013, DOI: 10.1111/dgd.12090

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    Cover Photograph: Hippo signaling controls cell fates in preimplantation mouse embryos. Slightly different mechanisms operate in regulation of Hippo signaling between 16-cell stage and early blastocyst stage with more than 32 cells. Panels show the confocal images of the 16-cell (left panel) and early blastocyst (right panel) stage embryos stained with phosphorylated Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin (magenta), a marker for apical domain and cell polarization, and the Hippo pathway coactivator Yap (green). In the early blastocysts, cell position regulates cell polarization through the Par-aPKC system, and cell polarity controls Hippo signaling. Therefore, all the outer cells are polarized and exhibit nuclear Yap. In contrast, at the 16-cell stage, Par-aPKC-independent mechanism and asymmetric cell division are also involved in regulation of cell polarization. Therefore, some outer cells are apolar and show cytoplasmic Yap.

    Development, Growth & Differentiation

    Volume 57, Issue 8, October 2015, Page: i,

    Version of Record online : 17 OCT 2015, DOI: 10.1111/dgd.12175

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    Development of the thalamo-dorsal ventricular ridge tract in the Chinese soft-shelled turtle, Pelodiscus sinensis

    Development, Growth & Differentiation

    Volume 57, Issue 1, January 2015, Pages: 40–57, Yasuhiko Tosa, Ayako Hirao, Ikumi Matsubara, Masahumi Kawaguchi, Makiko Fukui, Shigeru Kuratani and Yasunori Murakami

    Version of Record online : 14 DEC 2014, DOI: 10.1111/dgd.12186

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    Top row from the left: DAPI staining of a tadpole larvae of the ascidian, Halocynthia roretzi, see Yamada and Nishida, 376–386. Developing mouse cortex consisting with neural progenitor cells positive for Pax6 (magenta) and neurons marked with Tuj1 (green), see Tsunekawa et al., 349–357. Histograms of DNA content per nucleus of mouse cardiomyocytes (mono- and binucleate cells) during postnatal stages, see Takeuchi, 402–409. Middle row from the left: Switching from proliferation (PCNA, magenta) to differentiation (Prox1, green) in the lens, see Mochizuki and Masai, 387–401. Anterior view of the lens of 5 dpf zebrafi sh to show lens fi ber convergence (BODIPY ceramide staining) see Mochizuki and Masai, 387–401, Cell division of Rb-TKO differentiating cortical neurons, see Ajioka, 324–334. Bottom row from the left: Eye imaginal disc stained by anti-Elav (pan-neural marker; green) and Cut (cone cells marker; magenta) see Tsuda and Lim, 358–367. Schematic showing. Cdk5 regulates both presynaptic and postsynaptic proteins and thereby synaptic plasticity, see Kawauchi, 335–348, Developing mouse cerebral cortex. Neural progenitors and multipolar and locomoting neurons, where Cdk5 has various functions, are emphasized, see Kawauchi, 335–347.

    Development, Growth & Differentiation

    Volume 56, Issue 5, June 2014, Page: i,

    Version of Record online : 25 JUN 2014, DOI: 10.1111/dgd.12083

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    The lens equator: A platform for molecular machinery that regulates the switch from cell proliferation to differentiation in the vertebrate lens

    Development, Growth & Differentiation

    Volume 56, Issue 5, June 2014, Pages: 387–401, Toshiaki Mochizuki and Ichiro Masai

    Version of Record online : 11 APR 2014, DOI: 10.1111/dgd.12128

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    Issue Information

    Development, Growth & Differentiation

    Volume 57, Issue 4, May 2015, Pages: ii–iii,

    Version of Record online : 27 MAY 2015, DOI: 10.1111/dgd.12168

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    Localization of Wnt8 in the endoplasmic reticulum. Wnt8-HA, which has a dorsalization activity, was injected into a blastomere of an 8-cell-stage Xenopus embryo, and the embryo was fixed 2 hours before stage 10. Immunohistochemistry with anti-HA (left) and anti-PDI, ER specific protein, (center) shows that Wnt8 was localized in ER. See Motomura et al., 640–652

    Development, Growth & Differentiation

    Volume 56, Issue 9, December 2014, Page: i,

    Version of Record online : 17 DEC 2014, DOI: 10.1111/dgd.12087