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There are 8111601 results for: content related to: A pair of Barred Antshrikes ( Thamnophilus doliatus ) perched near their nest in French Guiana. Pairs of antshrikes perform vocal duets to defend their territories against rivals. Results of a playback experiment reveal that territorial antshrikes respond more aggressively to duets presented through stereo loudspeakers compared to a single loudspeaker, and that both the male and female display equivalent responses to same–sex and opposite–sex rivals.Photo reproduced by permission of Michel Giraud–Audine.

  1. A young male Bornean white-bearded gibbon (Hylobates albibarbus) is resting at noon, but always ready to move through the canopy of a rainforest at high speed. Photograph reproduced by permission of Johan Lind

    Ethology

    Volume 121, Issue 4, April 2015, Page: i,

    Version of Record online : 26 FEB 2015, DOI: 10.1111/eth.12303

  2. A pair of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) raids a colony of red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus). Female shakes incubating blackbirds from their nests, while male collects eggs for their chicks. Photo reproduced by permission of Alex Badyaev – www.tenbestphotos.com

    Ethology

    Volume 119, Issue 9, September 2013, Page: i,

    Version of Record online : 20 AUG 2013, DOI: 10.1111/eth.12134

  3. Female vervet monkey, Cercopithecus aethiops, grooming a male in Kruger National Park, South Africa. Photograph reproduced by permission of Emmanuel Do Linh San - www.pbase.com/emmanueldolinhsan

    Ethology

    Volume 122, Issue 2, February 2016, Page: i,

    Version of Record online : 6 JAN 2016, DOI: 10.1111/eth.12468

  4. Mother Plains Zebra, Equus quagga, interacting with her fawn in Etosha National Park, Namibia. Photograph reproduced by permission of Emmanuel Do Linh San

    Ethology

    Volume 122, Issue 6, June 2016, Page: i,

    Version of Record online : 26 APR 2016, DOI: 10.1111/eth.12479

  5. Chamaeleons are most famous for changing colour and moving their eyes independently of each other. However, both these behaviours are commonplace in many families of fish. For instance, this leopard flounder (Bothus pantherinus) changes colour rapidly to maximize its camouflage against the background and can readily move its eyes, one at a time, to look out for predators and prey. Photo reproduced by permission of Johan Lind, Stockholm University, Sweden.

    Ethology

    Volume 120, Issue 1, January 2014, Page: i,

    Version of Record online : 10 DEC 2013, DOI: 10.1111/eth.12152

  6. A dung beetle (Scarabaeus nigroaeneus) performing an orientation dance on top of its ball. During the dance, a dung beetle climbs on top of its ball and performs a series of rotations, before starting to roll its ball. This dance behaviour allows the beetles to compensate for disturbances to their straight-line rolling path, suggesting that it plays an important role in dung beetle orientation behaviour. Photo reproduced by permission of Emily Baird, Lund, Sweden.

    Ethology

    Volume 119, Issue 12, December 2013, Page: i,

    Version of Record online : 29 OCT 2013, DOI: 10.1111/eth.12151

  7. A red deer (Cervus elaphus) stag during the rutting season. The roaring indicates the stag's size and is used by rivals to assess the likelihood of winning a contest. Photo reproduced by permission of Oliver Krüger, Department of Animal Behaviour, Bielefeld University, Germany.

    Ethology

    Volume 119, Issue 3, March 2013, Page: i,

    Version of Record online : 14 FEB 2013, DOI: 10.1111/eth.12063

  8. Lappet-faced (Torgos tracheliotos) and White-backed Vultures (Gyps africanus) cleaning up one of the many casualties of the Serengeti Blue Wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus) migration in Tanzania. Photo reproduced by permission of Claire Spottiswoode – www.africancuckoos.com

    Ethology

    Volume 120, Issue 7, July 2014, Page: i,

    Version of Record online : 2 JUN 2014, DOI: 10.1111/eth.12159

  9. The Australian Thomisus spectabilis crab spider reflects UV light which attracts honeybees (Apis mellifera) to the flowers they sit on. Photo reproduced by permission of Ron Oldfield.

    Ethology

    Volume 117, Issue 7, July 2011, Page: i,

    Version of Record online : 12 JUN 2011, DOI: 10.1111/j.1439-0310.2011.01921.x

  10. Baby Chacma Baboon, Papio ursinus, travelling on its mother's back in Kruger National Park, South Africa. Photograph reproduced by permission of Emmanuel Do Linh San.

    Ethology

    Volume 122, Issue 11, November 2016, Page: i,

    Version of Record online : 6 OCT 2016, DOI: 10.1111/eth.12484

  11. A Greylag goose pair (Anser anser) along the river Alm in Grünau, Austria. Parental geese moult and are unable to fly while they raise their offspring. The feathers in the foreground indicate that primaries are re-growing. The parents won't be able to fly again until the goslings are fledging. Photo reproduced by permission of Josef Hemetsberger, Konrad Lorenz Research Station, University of Vienna, Austria

    Ethology

    Volume 118, Issue 9, September 2012, Page: i,

    Version of Record online : 24 JUL 2012, DOI: 10.1111/j.1439-0310.2012.02089.x

  12. The Responses of Duetting Antbirds to Stereo Duet Playback Provide Support for the Joint Territory Defence Hypothesis

    Ethology

    Volume 119, Issue 6, June 2013, Pages: 462–471, Julianne Koloff and Daniel J. Mennill

    Version of Record online : 19 MAR 2013, DOI: 10.1111/eth.12084

  13. Announcement

    Ethology

    Volume 102, Issue 1, January-December 1996, Page: 176,

    Version of Record online : 26 APR 2010, DOI: 10.1111/j.1439-0310.1996.tb01115.x

  14. Male Klipspringer, Oreotragus oreotragus, rubbing an itchy nostril with its tongue. Photograph taken in Kruger National Park, South Africa, and reproduced by permission of Emmanuel Do Linh San.

    Ethology

    Volume 122, Issue 10, October 2016, Page: i,

    Version of Record online : 14 SEP 2016, DOI: 10.1111/eth.12483

  15. A wild juvenile zebra finch at the door of its nestbox at Fowlers Gap Research Station (Australia). Photograph reproduced by permission of Clémentine Vignal

    Ethology

    Volume 122, Issue 3, March 2016, Page: i,

    Version of Record online : 24 JAN 2016, DOI: 10.1111/eth.12469

  16. A labyrinth spider, Agelena labyrinthica, guarding her developing egg sac and awaiting a passing meal. Photo reproduced by permission of Andrew Young –www.wildimages.org

    Ethology

    Volume 117, Issue 10, October 2011, Page: i,

    Version of Record online : 13 SEP 2011, DOI: 10.1111/j.1439-0310.2011.01954.x

  17. A chacma baboon, Papio ursinus, in evening light, Mpumalanga, South Africa. Photo reproduced by permission of Andrew Young –http://www.wildimages.org

    Ethology

    Volume 117, Issue 2, February 2011, Page: i,

    Version of Record online : 4 JAN 2011, DOI: 10.1111/j.1439-0310.2010.01869.x

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    FRET (Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer), which is a phenomenon of energy transfer between two adjacent fluorescent molecules, has been applied to visualization of interaction between proteins in living cells and so on. To carry out high-efficiency FRET, not only the distance between two molecules must be very close (less than about 10 nm) but the relative orientation of two chromophores must also be optimized. One of the women in this picture carries the other with attention paid on how they are oriented to each other, and successfully lightens the plum blossoms just like FRET. Designed by TRAIS Co., Ltd. (Kobe, Japan)

    Genes to Cells

    Volume 19, Issue 3, March 2014, Page: i,

    Version of Record online : 24 FEB 2014, DOI: 10.1111/gtc.12141

  19. Female Lion, Panthera leo, perched on a Yellow Fever Tree, Acacia xanthophloea, in Lake Nakuru National Park, Kenya. Photograph reproduced by permission of Emmanuel Do Linh San

    Ethology

    Volume 122, Issue 9, September 2016, Page: i,

    Version of Record online : 4 AUG 2016, DOI: 10.1111/eth.12482

  20. You have free access to this content
    Search Terms Typically Required to be Researched by Public Company in Option Backdating Investigations by the Securities and Exchange Commission

    Executive Compensation Best Practices

    Frederick D. Lipman, Steven E. Hall, Pages: 285–287, 2015

    Published Online : 19 SEP 2015, DOI: 10.1002/9781119197621.app5