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There are 7884445 results for: content related to: Chamaeleons are most famous for changing colour and moving their eyes independently of each other. However, both these behaviours are commonplace in many families of fish. For instance, this leopard flounder ( Bothus pantherinus ) changes colour rapidly to maximize its camouflage against the background and can readily move its eyes, one at a time, to look out for predators and prey. Photo reproduced by permission of Johan Lind, Stockholm University, Sweden.

  1. Lorenz, K. 1992: Denkwege. Ein Lesebuch. Herausgegeben von Beatrice Lorenz. Piper Verlag, München, Zürich

    Ethology

    Volume 102, Issue 1, January-December 1996, Pages: 167–175,

    Version of Record online : 26 APR 2010, DOI: 10.1111/j.1439-0310.1996.tb01114.x

  2. A young male Bornean white-bearded gibbon (Hylobates albibarbus) is resting at noon, but always ready to move through the canopy of a rainforest at high speed. Photograph reproduced by permission of Johan Lind

    Ethology

    Volume 121, Issue 4, April 2015, Page: i,

    Version of Record online : 26 FEB 2015, DOI: 10.1111/eth.12303

  3. Female vervet monkey, Cercopithecus aethiops, grooming a male in Kruger National Park, South Africa. Photograph reproduced by permission of Emmanuel Do Linh San - www.pbase.com/emmanueldolinhsan

    Ethology

    Volume 122, Issue 2, February 2016, Page: i,

    Version of Record online : 6 JAN 2016, DOI: 10.1111/eth.12468

  4. Mother Plains Zebra, Equus quagga, interacting with her fawn in Etosha National Park, Namibia. Photograph reproduced by permission of Emmanuel Do Linh San

    Ethology

    Volume 122, Issue 6, June 2016, Page: i,

    Version of Record online : 26 APR 2016, DOI: 10.1111/eth.12479

  5. A pair of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) raids a colony of red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus). Female shakes incubating blackbirds from their nests, while male collects eggs for their chicks. Photo reproduced by permission of Alex Badyaev – www.tenbestphotos.com

    Ethology

    Volume 119, Issue 9, September 2013, Page: i,

    Version of Record online : 20 AUG 2013, DOI: 10.1111/eth.12134

  6. Reviews

    Ethology

    Volume 103, Issue 7, July 1997, Pages: 614–618,

    Version of Record online : 26 APR 2010, DOI: 10.1111/j.1439-0310.1997.tb00172.x

  7. A dung beetle (Scarabaeus nigroaeneus) performing an orientation dance on top of its ball. During the dance, a dung beetle climbs on top of its ball and performs a series of rotations, before starting to roll its ball. This dance behaviour allows the beetles to compensate for disturbances to their straight-line rolling path, suggesting that it plays an important role in dung beetle orientation behaviour. Photo reproduced by permission of Emily Baird, Lund, Sweden.

    Ethology

    Volume 119, Issue 12, December 2013, Page: i,

    Version of Record online : 29 OCT 2013, DOI: 10.1111/eth.12151

  8. Soon after copulation has been completed, a pair of the damselfly Ischnura denticollis (male above, female below) remains in tandem. During copulation, the male removes the sperm the female received from previous copulations, and then transfers his own. Reproduced by permission of Dustin Huntington.

    Ethology

    Volume 118, Issue 2, February 2012, Page: i,

    Version of Record online : 4 JAN 2012, DOI: 10.1111/j.1439-0310.2011.02012.x

  9. A group of razorfish (Aeoliscus strigatus) follows the surge along the reef edge at Nusa Lembongan, Indonesia. These planktonic feeders are oddly shaped, suck minute crustaceans through a tube-like mouth while feeding, and rarely swim in a horizontal body posture. It is one of many little-studied fish species in tropical seas. Photo reproduced by permission of Johan Lind, Stockholm University, Sweden.

    Ethology

    Volume 119, Issue 11, November 2013, Page: i,

    Version of Record online : 3 OCT 2013, DOI: 10.1111/eth.12150

  10. A Greylag goose pair (Anser anser) along the river Alm in Grünau, Austria. Parental geese moult and are unable to fly while they raise their offspring. The feathers in the foreground indicate that primaries are re-growing. The parents won't be able to fly again until the goslings are fledging. Photo reproduced by permission of Josef Hemetsberger, Konrad Lorenz Research Station, University of Vienna, Austria

    Ethology

    Volume 118, Issue 9, September 2012, Page: i,

    Version of Record online : 24 JUL 2012, DOI: 10.1111/j.1439-0310.2012.02089.x

  11. Newly hatched zebra finch, Taeniopygia guttata, begging for food. Zebra finches hatch at circa 0.8 gram from eggs weighing roughly 1 gram.

    Ethology

    Volume 118, Issue 5, May 2012, Page: i,

    Version of Record online : 12 APR 2012, DOI: 10.1111/j.1439-0310.2011.02046.x

  12. Announcement

    Ethology

    Volume 102, Issue 1, January-December 1996, Page: 176,

    Version of Record online : 26 APR 2010, DOI: 10.1111/j.1439-0310.1996.tb01115.x

  13. A male black-bellied bustard (Lissotis melanogaster) pauses between bouts of giving his burping call on an East African morning. Photo reproduced by permission of Claire Spottiswoode - www.africancuckoos.com

    Ethology

    Volume 120, Issue 2, February 2014, Page: i,

    Version of Record online : 3 JAN 2014, DOI: 10.1111/eth.12153

  14. Oviposition Site Choice in the Yellow Dung Fly Scathophaga stercoraria

    Ethology

    Volume 105, Issue 5, May 1999, Pages: 423–430, Paul I. Ward, Massimiliano Foglia and Wolf U. Blanckenhorn

    Version of Record online : 25 DEC 2001, DOI: 10.1046/j.1439-0310.1999.00419.x

  15. A labyrinth spider, Agelena labyrinthica, guarding her developing egg sac and awaiting a passing meal. Photo reproduced by permission of Andrew Young –www.wildimages.org

    Ethology

    Volume 117, Issue 10, October 2011, Page: i,

    Version of Record online : 13 SEP 2011, DOI: 10.1111/j.1439-0310.2011.01954.x

  16. ChemInform Abstract: CONDENSATIONS WITH HYDRAZINE-N,N′-DICARBOXAMIDINE. XXV. REACTION WITH AROMATICALLY AND HETEROCYCLICALLY SUBSTITUTED β-DIKETONES

    Chemischer Informationsdienst

    Volume 10, Issue 47, November 20, 1979, Page: no, A. KREUTZBERGER and G. RISSE

    Version of Record online : 14 APR 2016, DOI: 10.1002/chin.197947243

  17. ChemInform Abstract: SYNTHESIS OF IMMUNOLOGICALLY ACTIVE MURAMYL DIPEPTIDE DERIVATIVES CONTAINING A QUINONYL MOIETY VIA AMINOACYL INTERMEDIATES

    Chemischer Informationsdienst

    Volume 13, Issue 3, January 19, 1982, Page: no, T. FUKUDA, S. KOBAYASHI, H. YUKIMASA, I. IMADA, M. FUJINO, I. AZUMA and Y. YAMAMURA

    Version of Record online : 27 APR 2016, DOI: 10.1002/chin.198203296

  18. ChemInform Abstract: Molecular and Crystal Structures of Two Terminally Blocked Tripeptides Corresponding to the 3-5 Sequence of the Peptaibol Antibiotics Antiamoebins

    ChemInform

    Volume 20, Issue 32, August 8, 1989, Page: no, G. VALLE, M. CRISMA, C. TONIOLO, R. BEISSWENGER, A. RIEKER and G. JUNG

    Version of Record online : 24 MAY 2016, DOI: 10.1002/chin.198932289

  19. ChemInform Abstract: OPTICALLY DETECTED MAGNETIC RESONANCE IN AMORPHOUS SEMICONDUCTORS

    Chemischer Informationsdienst

    Volume 14, Issue 39, September 27, 1983, Page: no, K. MORIGAKI

    Version of Record online : 4 MAY 2016, DOI: 10.1002/chin.198339359

  20. ChemInform Abstract: Electrochemically Reduced Photoreversible Products of Pyrimidine and Purine Analogues

    Chemischer Informationsdienst

    Volume 17, Issue 16, April 22, 1986, Page: no, B. CZOCHRALSKA, M. WRONA and D. SHUGAR

    Version of Record online : 10 MAY 2016, DOI: 10.1002/chin.198616388