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There are 22091 results for: content related to: Habitat Overlap and Facilitation in Tamarisk and Box Elder Stands: Implications for Tamarisk Control Using Native Plants

  1. Vegetation Response Following Invasive Tamarisk (Tamarix spp.) Removal and Implications for Riparian Restoration

    Restoration Ecology

    Volume 14, Issue 3, September 2006, Pages: 461–472, Rebecca S. Harms and Ron D. Hiebert

    Version of Record online : 15 AUG 2006, DOI: 10.1111/j.1526-100X.2006.00154.x

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    Canopy shade and the successional replacement of tamarisk by native box elder

    Journal of Applied Ecology

    Volume 45, Issue 2, April 2008, Pages: 505–514, J. M. Dewine and D. J. Cooper

    Version of Record online : 11 DEC 2007, DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2664.2007.01440.x

  3. Tamarisk biocontrol in the western United States: ecological and societal implications

    Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment

    Volume 8, Issue 9, November 2010, Pages: 467–474, Kevin R Hultine, Jayne Belnap, Charles van Riper III, James R Ehleringer, Philip E Dennison, Martha E Lee, Pamela L Nagler, Keirith A Snyder, Shauna M Uselman and Jason B West

    Version of Record online : 4 NOV 2009, DOI: 10.1890/090031

  4. Disrupting mycorrhizal mutualisms: a potential mechanism by which exotic tamarisk outcompetes native cottonwoods

    Ecological Applications

    Volume 22, Issue 2, March 2012, Pages: 532–549, Kelley A. Meinhardt and Catherine A. Gehring

    Version of Record online : 1 MAR 2012, DOI: 10.1890/11-1247.1

  5. Rethinking Avian Response to Tamarix on the Lower Colorado River: A Threshold Hypothesis

    Restoration Ecology

    Volume 16, Issue 1, March 2008, Pages: 155–167, Charles Van Riper III, Kristina L. Paxton, Chris O’Brien, Patrick B. Shafroth and Laura J. McGrath

    Version of Record online : 11 MAR 2008, DOI: 10.1111/j.1526-100X.2007.00354.x

  6. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
    Variations in soil nutrients and salinity caused by tamarisk in the coastal wetland of the Laizhou Bay, China

    Ecosphere

    Volume 8, Issue 2, February 2017, Jingtao Liu, Qiangqiang Rong and Yanyun Zhao

    Version of Record online : 1 FEB 2017, DOI: 10.1002/ecs2.1672

  7. Efficacy and environmental fate of imazapyr from directed helicopter applications targeting Tamarix species infestations in Colorado

    Pest Management Science

    Volume 72, Issue 2, February 2016, Pages: 379–387, Cameron H Douglass, Scott J Nissen and Andrew R Kniss

    Version of Record online : 11 MAY 2015, DOI: 10.1002/ps.4016

  8. Reduced evapotranspiration from leaf beetle induced tamarisk defoliation in the Lower Virgin River using satellite-based energy balance

    Ecohydrology

    Volume 9, Issue 1, January 2016, Pages: 179–193, Ryan Liebert, Justin Huntington, Charles Morton, Sachiko Sueki and Kumud Acharya

    Version of Record online : 7 APR 2015, DOI: 10.1002/eco.1623

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    When do plants modify fluvial processes? Plant-hydraulic interactions under variable flow and sediment supply rates

    Journal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface

    Volume 120, Issue 2, February 2015, Pages: 325–345, Rebecca B. Manners, Andrew C. Wilcox, Li Kui, Anne F. Lightbody, John C. Stella and Leonard S. Sklar

    Version of Record online : 21 FEB 2015, DOI: 10.1002/2014JF003265

  10. Defoliation effects of Diorhabda carinulata on tamarisk evapotranspiration and groundwater levels

    Ecohydrology

    Volume 8, Issue 8, December 2015, Pages: 1560–1571, Sachiko Sueki, Kumud Acharya, Justin Huntington, Ryan Liebert, John Healey, Richard Jasoni and Michael Young

    Version of Record online : 6 FEB 2015, DOI: 10.1002/eco.1604

  11. A tamarisk habitat suitability map for the continental United States

    Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment

    Volume 4, Issue 1, February 2006, Pages: 11–17, Jeffrey T. Morisette, Catherine S. Jarnevich, Asad Ullah, Weijie Cai, Jeffrey A. Pedelty, James E. Gentle, Thomas J. Stohlgren and John L. Schnase

    Version of Record online : 1 FEB 2006, DOI: 10.1890/1540-9295(2006)004[0012:ATHSMF]2.0.CO;2

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    Ecogeomorphic feedbacks and flood loss of riparian tree seedlings in meandering channel experiments

    Water Resources Research

    Volume 50, Issue 12, December 2014, Pages: 9366–9384, Li Kui, John C. Stella, Anne Lightbody and Andrew C. Wilcox

    Version of Record online : 11 DEC 2014, DOI: 10.1002/2014WR015719

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    Ecohydrological consequences of non-native riparian vegetation in the southwestern United States: A review from an ecophysiological perspective

    Water Resources Research

    Volume 47, Issue 7, July 2011, K. R. Hultine and S. E. Bush

    Version of Record online : 22 JUL 2011, DOI: 10.1029/2010WR010317

  14. Environmental tolerance of an invasive riparian tree and its potential for continued spread in the southwestern US

    Journal of Vegetation Science

    Volume 21, Issue 4, August 2010, Pages: 733–743, Lindsay V. Reynolds and David J. Cooper

    Version of Record online : 26 MAR 2010, DOI: 10.1111/j.1654-1103.2010.01179.x

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    Coupled hydrogeomorphic and woody-seedling responses to controlled flood releases in a dryland river

    Water Resources Research

    Volume 49, Issue 5, May 2013, Pages: 2843–2860, Andrew C. Wilcox and Patrick B. Shafroth

    Version of Record online : 28 MAY 2013, DOI: 10.1002/wrcr.20256

  16. The long-term legacy of geomorphic and riparian vegetation feedbacks on the dammed Bill Williams River, Arizona, USA

    Ecohydrology

    Li Kui, John C. Stella, Patrick B. Shafroth, P. Kyle House and Andrew C. Wilcox

    Version of Record online : 23 FEB 2017, DOI: 10.1002/eco.1839

  17. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
    Hybridization of an invasive shrub affects tolerance and resistance to defoliation by a biological control agent

    Evolutionary Applications

    Volume 7, Issue 3, March 2014, Pages: 381–393, Wyatt I. Williams, Jonathan M. Friedman, John F. Gaskin and Andrew P. Norton

    Version of Record online : 15 JAN 2014, DOI: 10.1111/eva.12134

  18. Tamarix as Habitat for Birds: Implications for Riparian Restoration in the Southwestern United States

    Restoration Ecology

    Volume 16, Issue 1, March 2008, Pages: 146–154, Mark K. Sogge, Susan J. Sferra and Eben H. Paxton

    Version of Record online : 11 MAR 2008, DOI: 10.1111/j.1526-100X.2008.00357.x

  19. Changing Perceptions of Change: The Role of Scientists in Tamarix and River Management

    Restoration Ecology

    Volume 17, Issue 2, March 2009, Pages: 177–186, Juliet C. Stromberg, Matthew K. Chew, Pamela L. Nagler and Edward P. Glenn

    Version of Record online : 5 MAR 2009, DOI: 10.1111/j.1526-100X.2008.00514.x

  20. Riparian Butterfly (Papilionoidea and Hesperioidea) Assemblages Associated with Tamarix-Dominated, Native Vegetation–Dominated, and Tamarix Removal Sites along the Arkansas River, Colorado, U.S.A.

    Restoration Ecology

    Volume 16, Issue 1, March 2008, Pages: 168–179, S. Mark Nelson and Rick Wydoski

    Version of Record online : 11 MAR 2008, DOI: 10.1111/j.1526-100X.2007.00358.x