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There are 42083 results for: content related to: Post-event information presented in a question form eliminates the misinformation effect

  1. The influence of social, para-social, and nonsocial misleading post-event sources on memory performance

    European Journal of Social Psychology

    Volume 46, Issue 2, March 2016, Pages: 185–197, Malwina Szpitalak, Mateusz Polak, Romuald Polczyk and Karolina Dukała

    Version of Record online : 17 AUG 2015, DOI: 10.1002/ejsp.2136

  2. Comparing methods of encountering post-event information: the power of co-witness suggestion

    Applied Cognitive Psychology

    Volume 20, Issue 8, December 2006, Pages: 1083–1099, Helen M. Paterson and Richard I. Kemp

    Version of Record online : 6 JUL 2006, DOI: 10.1002/acp.1261

  3. Effects of contextual cues in recall and recognition memory: The misinformation effect reconsidered

    British Journal of Psychology

    Volume 98, Issue 3, August 2007, Pages: 485–498, Justine M. Campbell, Mark S. Edwards, Mark S. Horswill and Shaun Helman

    Version of Record online : 24 DEC 2010, DOI: 10.1348/000712606X160768

  4. Habitual Susceptibility to Misinformation and Individual Differences in Eyewitness Memory

    Applied Cognitive Psychology

    Volume 11, Issue 3, June 1997, Pages: 233–251, Jennifer L. Tomes and Albert N. Katz

    Version of Record online : 6 JAN 1999, DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1099-0720(199706)11:3<233::AID-ACP447>3.0.CO;2-V

  5. Testing Increases Suggestibility for Narrative-based Misinformation but Reduces Suggestibility for Question-based Misinformation

    Behavioral Sciences & the Law

    Volume 31, Issue 5, September/October 2013, Pages: 593–606, Jessica A. LaPaglia and Jason C. K. Chan

    Version of Record online : 16 SEP 2013, DOI: 10.1002/bsl.2090

  6. You have free access to this content
    Say it to my face: Examining the effects of socially encountered misinformation

    Legal and Criminological Psychology

    Volume 9, Issue 2, September 2004, Pages: 215–227, Fiona Gabbert, Amina Memon, Kevin Allan and Daniel B. Wright

    Version of Record online : 16 DEC 2010, DOI: 10.1348/1355325041719428

  7. Adult Eyewitness Memory and Compliance: Effects of Post-event Misinformation on Memory for a Negative Event

    Behavioral Sciences & the Law

    Volume 31, Issue 5, September/October 2013, Pages: 541–558, Pedro M. Paz-Alonso, Gail S. Goodman and Izaskun Ibabe

    Version of Record online : 11 SEP 2013, DOI: 10.1002/bsl.2081

  8. Treat and trick: A new way to increase false memory

    Applied Cognitive Psychology

    Volume 24, Issue 9, December 2010, Pages: 1199–1208, Bi Zhu, Chuansheng Chen, Elizabeth F. Loftus, Chongde Lin and Qi Dong

    Version of Record online : 5 OCT 2009, DOI: 10.1002/acp.1637

  9. Forced confabulation more strongly influences event memory if suggestions are other-generated than self-generated

    Legal and Criminological Psychology

    Volume 14, Issue 2, September 2009, Pages: 241–252, Kathy Pezdek, Shirley T. Lam and Kathryn Sperry

    Version of Record online : 24 DEC 2010, DOI: 10.1348/135532508X344773

  10. The effects of the age of eyewitnesses on the accuracy and suggestibility of their testimony

    Applied Cognitive Psychology

    Volume 11, Issue 5, October 1997, Pages: 415–430, Pamela Coxon and Tim Valentine

    Version of Record online : 6 JAN 1999, DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1099-0720(199710)11:5<415::AID-ACP469>3.0.CO;2-A

  11. Memory for central and peripheral actions and props after varied post-event presentation

    Legal and Criminological Psychology

    Volume 3, Issue 2, September 1998, Pages: 321–346, Wendy P. Heath and James R. Erickson

    Version of Record online : 6 JUN 2011, DOI: 10.1111/j.2044-8333.1998.tb00369.x

  12. Choose Your Words Wisely: What Verbal Hesitation Indicates About Eyewitness Accuracy

    Applied Cognitive Psychology

    Volume 29, Issue 5, September/October 2015, Pages: 735–741, Ayanna K. Thomas, Caroline Chen, Leamarie T. Gordon and Thora Tenbrink

    Version of Record online : 3 AUG 2015, DOI: 10.1002/acp.3157

  13. Processing resources and eyewitness suggestibility

    Legal and Criminological Psychology

    Volume 3, Issue 2, September 1998, Pages: 305–320, Maria S. Zaragoza and Sean M. Lane

    Version of Record online : 6 JUN 2011, DOI: 10.1111/j.2044-8333.1998.tb00368.x

  14. Using an Individual Differences Approach to Examine Two Distinct Types of Suggestibility Effects

    Applied Cognitive Psychology

    Volume 27, Issue 1, January/February 2013, Pages: 2–11, Mitchell L. Eisen, Dayna M. Gomes, William G. Lorber, Cynthia I. Perez and Hitomi Uchishiba

    Version of Record online : 30 AUG 2012, DOI: 10.1002/acp.2864

  15. The effect of presentation medium of post-event information: impact of co-witness information

    Applied Cognitive Psychology

    Volume 20, Issue 5, July 2006, Pages: 575–581, Yukio Itsukushima, Mariko Nishi, Masakazu Maruyama and Masanobu Takahashi

    Version of Record online : 29 JUN 2006, DOI: 10.1002/acp.1208

  16. It Must Be My Favourite Brand: Using Retroactive Brand Replacements in Doctored Photographs to Influence Brand Preferences

    Applied Cognitive Psychology

    Volume 30, Issue 6, November/December 2016, Pages: 863–870, Maria V. Hellenthal, Mark L. Howe and Lauren M. Knott

    Version of Record online : 21 SEP 2016, DOI: 10.1002/acp.3271

  17. Misleading Suggestions can Alter Later Memory Reports even Following a Cognitive Interview

    Applied Cognitive Psychology

    Volume 28, Issue 1, January/February 2014, Pages: 1–9, Jessica A. LaPaglia, Miko M. Wilford, Jillian R. Rivard, Jason C. K. Chan and Ronald P. Fisher

    Version of Record online : 9 OCT 2013, DOI: 10.1002/acp.2950

  18. Trace-strength and source-monitoring accounts of accuracy and metacognitive resolution in the misinformation paradigm

    Applied Cognitive Psychology

    Volume 25, Issue 2, March/April 2011, Pages: 324–335, Philip A. Higham, Karlos Luna and Jessica Bloomfield

    Version of Record online : 21 APR 2010, DOI: 10.1002/acp.1694

  19. Memory distrust and acceptance of misinformation

    Applied Cognitive Psychology

    Volume 24, Issue 6, September 2010, Pages: 885–896, Saskia van Bergen, Robert Horselenberg, Harald Merckelbach, Marko Jelicic and Roos Beckers

    Version of Record online : 17 JUL 2009, DOI: 10.1002/acp.1595

  20. Dividing attention during a witnessed event increases eyewitness suggestibility

    Applied Cognitive Psychology

    Volume 20, Issue 2, March 2006, Pages: 199–212, Sean M. Lane

    Version of Record online : 11 JAN 2006, DOI: 10.1002/acp.1177