Endogenous Toxins: Targets for Disease Treatment and Prevention

Endogenous Toxins: Targets for Disease Treatment and Prevention

Editor(s): Peter J. O'Brien, W. Robert Bruce

Published Online: 25 JAN 2010

Print ISBN: 9783527323630

Online ISBN: 9783527628100

DOI: 10.1002/9783527628100

About this Book

Designed as a first-stop reference for researchers and professionals in toxicology, pharmacology and medicine, this handbook is the very first to tie together the knowledge from many disciplines that has so far been available only from widely dispersed sources in the primary literature. As such, it presents the complete picture on what is currently known about endogenous toxins, including their generation, mode of action, resulting disease condition, and available countermeasures.
Clearly divided into four parts, the first systematically covers important toxic molecule species, including metabolic intermediates and reactive oxygen species. The second discusses the role of genetically determined metabolic malfunctions, such as galactosemia, hyperlipidemia, porphyria, hemochromatosis and related conditions, while part three looks at acquired and chronic diseases caused or exacerbated by endogenous toxins, such as hepatic injury, asthma, rheumatism, colorectal cancer, reperfusion diseases, neurodegneration and aging. The final part reviews currents strategies to control and minimize the effect of endogenous toxins, either by nutritional or pharmacological interventions.
With its complete coverage integrating molecular and systemic aspects from the biochemical basis to human disease conditions, this comprehensive reference will appeal to a broad target group of toxicologists, biochemists, nutrition specialists and physicians.

Table of contents

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  1. Part One: Endogenous Toxins Associated with Excessive Sugar, Fat, Meat, or Alcohol Consumption - Chemistry and Biochemistry

  2. Part One: Endogenous Toxins Associated with Excessive Sugar, Fat, Meat, or Alcohol Consumption - Molecular Toxicology Mechanisms of Dietary Endogenous Toxins

    1. Chapter 7

      Fructose-Derived Endogenous Toxins (pages 173–212)

      Prof. Peter J. O'Brien, Cynthia Y. Feng, Owen Lee, Q. Dong, Rhea Mehta, Jeff Bruce and Prof. W. Robert Bruce

  3. Part Two: Genetics: Endogenous Toxins Associated with Inborn Errors of Metabolism

    1. Chapter 14

      Homocysteine as an Endogenous Toxin in Cardiovascular Disease (pages 349–378)

      Sana Basseri, Jennifer Caldwell, Shantanu Sengupta, Arun Kumar and Richard C. Austin

  4. Part Three: Examples of Endogenous Toxins Associated with Acquired Diseases or Animal Disease Models

    1. Chapter 27

      Lifestyle, Endogenous Toxins, and Colorectal Cancer Risk (pages 673–693)

      Gail McKeown-Eyssen, Jeff Bruce, Owen Lee, Prof. Peter J. O'Brien and Prof. W. Robert Bruce

    2. Chapter 32

      Endogenous Toxins Associated with Life Expectancy and Aging (pages 769–786)

      Victoria Ayala, Jordi Boada, José Serrano, Manuel Portero-Otín and Reinald Pamplona

  5. Part Four: Therapeutics Proposed for Decreasing Endogenous Toxins

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    1. You have free access to this content

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