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Cancer Cytopathology

Cover image for Cancer Cytopathology

25 February 1997

Volume 81, Issue 1

Pages 1–63

Currently known as: Cancer Cytopathology

  1. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Contemporary Issue
    4. Original Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      To the reader (pages 1–2)

      William J. Frable

      Article first published online: 10 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19970225)81:1<1::AID-CNCR1>3.0.CO;2-X

      Building on its commitment to eliminate cancer as a major health problem, the American Cancer Society inaugurates, with this issue of Cancer Cytopathology, the first section of Cancer devoted to a specialty area in the diagnosis, research, and treatment of cancer and related diseases.

      See also pages 6-9, 16-21, 29-32, and 33-9.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Should specimen adequacy be determined by the opinion of the aspirator or by the cells on the slides? (pages 3–5)

      Nour Sneige

      Article first published online: 10 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19970225)81:1<3::AID-CNCR2>3.0.CO;2-V

      Cell quantitation reduces false-negative rates for both palpable and nonpalpable breast lesions, especially when pathologists interpret aspirates that they did not personally obtain.

      See also pages 16-21.

  2. Contemporary Issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Contemporary Issue
    4. Original Articles
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      Probabilistic approach to the reporting of fine-needle aspiration cytology of the breast (pages 6–9)

      David L. Page, Joyce E. Johnson and William D. Dupont

      Article first published online: 10 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19970225)81:1<6::AID-CNCR3>3.0.CO;2-S

      Methods of reporting cytologic results from fine-needle aspiration of the breast should include a statement of probability as to the final diagnosis after subsequent studies. This approach is appropriate for the expectations of a clinical setting and guides subsequent clinical management.

      See also pages 1-2.

  3. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Contemporary Issue
    4. Original Articles
    1. Gynecologic Cytopathology
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      Koilocytotic atypia in papanicolaou smears : Reproducibility and biopsy correlations (pages 10–15)

      Kenneth R. Lee, Lori J. Minter and Christopher P. Crum

      Article first published online: 10 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19970225)81:1<10::AID-CNCR4>3.0.CO;2-K

      The cytologic separation of koilocytosis from other low grade cellular changes is not reproducible and does not predict a lower frequency of high grade lesions on biopsy follow-up.

    2. Fine-Needle Aspiration
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      What constitutes an adequate smear in fine-needle aspiration cytology of the breast? (pages 16–21)

      Lester J. Layfield, Eoghan E. Mooney, Ben Glasgow, Sharon Hirschowitz and Alice Coogan

      Article first published online: 10 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19970225)81:1<16::AID-CNCR5>3.0.CO;2-E

      Few statistically based criteria for the adequacy of breast fine-needle aspiration smears have been published. In assessing the role of sampling in false-negative diagnoses, the authors found that a cutpoint of 6 cell clusters or a prominent number of single cells optimized the balance between the sampling false-negative (1.5%) and the unsatisfactory (20.2%) rates for epithelial lesions of the breast. Excluding only smears with no cell clusters would have yielded a false-negative rate of 2.1%, associated with an unsatisfactory rate of 13.7%.

      See also pages 1-2 and 3-5.

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      Can nonproliferative breast disease and proliferative breast disease without atypia be Distinguished by fine-needle aspiration cytology? (pages 22–28)

      Andra R. Frost, Aziz Aksu, Ronald Kurstin and Mary K. Sidawy

      Article first published online: 10 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19970225)81:1<22::AID-CNCR6>3.0.CO;2-I

      There is significant overlap in the cytologic features of nonproliferative breast disease and proliferative breast disease without atypia. Consequently, fine-needle aspiration may be of limited usefulness in distinguishing these entities.

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      Fine-needle aspiration cytology of pleomorphic lobular carcinoma of the breast : Comparison with the classic type (pages 29–32)

      Manon Auger and Istvan Hüttner

      Article first published online: 10 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19970225)81:1<29::AID-CNCR7>3.0.CO;2-B

      Although exhibiting many cytologic features in common with classic lobular carcinoma such as indian files and cytoplasmic vacuoles, the fine-needle aspirates of the pleomorphic variant differ from the classic type in their tendency to yield greater cellularity, larger cell size, and, particularly, more pleomorphic nuclei.

      See also pages 1-2.

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      Core needle biopsy : A useful adjunct to fine-needle aspiration in select patients with palpable breast lesions (pages 33–39)

      Barbara D. Florentine, Camilla J. Cobb, Kenneth Frankel, Timothy Greaves and Sue Ellen Martin

      Article first published online: 10 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19970225)81:1<33::AID-CNCR8>3.0.CO;2-H

      Compared with fine-needle aspiration (FNA) alone, the use of a combined FNA/core needle biopsy procedure in select patients with palpable breast lesions can increase diagnostic yield and provide good tissue for ancillary studies when utilized in the proper setting. The authors believe that the FNA cytopathologist is the most appropriate physician to decide whether or not such an adjunct core is necessary and should perform the procedure if it is deemed necessary.

      See also pages 1-2.

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      A spectrum of cytomorphologic variations in medullary thyroid carcinoma : Fine-needle aspiration findings in 19 cases (pages 40–44)

      Ileana Green, Syed Z. Ali, Elizabeth A. Allen and Maureen F. Zakowski

      Article first published online: 10 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19970225)81:1<40::AID-CNCR9>3.0.CO;2-K

      Cytomorphologic variations in the appearance of medullary thyroid carcinoma and their usefulness in diagnosis are discussed.

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      The vascular architecture of renal cell carcinoma in fine-needle aspiration biopsies : An aid in its distinction from hepatocellular carcinoma (pages 45–50)

      Michele Weir and Martha Bishop Pitman

      Article first published online: 10 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19970225)81:1<45::AID-CNCR10>3.0.CO;2-C

      Vascular patterns, especially peripheral endothelium (endothelial cells wrapping around smooth-edged nests and trabeculae of hepatocytes), are useful in distinguishing hepatocellular carcinoma from renal cell carcinoma in fine-needle aspiration biopsy specimens.

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      Comparison of the costs of fine-needle aspiration and open surgical biopsy as methods for obtaining a pathologic diagnosis (pages 51–56)

      David L. Rimm, Janet F. Stastny, Eric B. Rimm, Sanjay Ayer and William J. Frable

      Article first published online: 10 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19970225)81:1<51::AID-CNCR11>3.0.CO;2-B

      Many studies have shown the effectiveness of fine-needle aspiration (FNA) as an alternative to open surgical biopsy for pathologic diagnosis. This study quantifies the substantial savings accrued, per 1000 FNAs of palpable lesions, on the basis of the distribution of FNAs seen over a 20-year period at a single institution.

    9. Immunocytochemistry
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      Effusion cytology of malignant melanoma : A morphologic and immunocytochemical analysis including application of the MART-1 antibody (pages 57–63)

      Michael W. Beaty, Patricia Fetsch, Anna Maria Wilder, Francesco Marincola and Andrea Abati

      Article first published online: 10 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19970225)81:1<57::AID-CNCR12>3.0.CO;2-B

      The cytologic appearance of malignant melanoma in effusions can mimic the appearance of adenocarcinoma and reactive mesothelial cells. Through the use of a combination of cytologic and immunocytochemical features, a diagnosis can be made with confidence.

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