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Cancer

Cover image for Cancer

1 October 1997

Volume 80, Issue 7

Pages 1179–1362

  1. Review Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Review Articles
    3. Original Articles
    4. Communications
    5. Original Articles
    6. Correspondence
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      A comprehensive review of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin in patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma (pages 1179–1187)

      David Machover

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19971001)80:7<1179::AID-CNCR1>3.0.CO;2-G

      The combination of LV and 5-FU provides a favorable treatment regimen for patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma. Growing evidence suggests that altering the dose and schedule of both LV and 5-FU can impact positively on the response rate.

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      Lymph node micrometastases from breast carcinoma : Reviewing the dilemma (pages 1188–1197)

      Kambiz Dowlatshahi, Ming Fan, Howard C. Snider and Fahim A. Habib

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19971001)80:7<1188::AID-CNCR2>3.0.CO;2-H

      Current techniques for staging breast carcinoma have not been successful in identifying the subset of lymph node negative patients who would benefit from adjuvant systemic therapy. This review aims to elucidate the role of lymph node micrometastases in disease recurrence and outcome.

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      Natural history and therapy of metastatic renal cell carcinoma : The role of interleukin-2 (pages 1198–1220)

      Ronald M. Bukowski

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19971001)80:7<1198::AID-CNCR3>3.0.CO;2-H

      The activity of interleukin-2 was evaluated in a review of the efficacy of immunomodulatory agents in the treatment of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Cytokine therapy may represent the most useful approach currently available for a subset of patients, but palliative measures, observation, or experimental therapy remain important options due to the nearly incurable nature of the disease.

  2. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Review Articles
    3. Original Articles
    4. Communications
    5. Original Articles
    6. Correspondence
    1. Anatomic Site

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      A phase I/II study of sequential, dose-escalated, high dose ifosfamide plus doxorubicin with peripheral blood stem cell support for the treatment of patients with advanced soft tissue sarcomas (pages 1221–1227)

      Carsten Bokemeyer, Anke Franzke, Jörg T. Hartmann, Christoph Schöber, Lubomir Arseniev, Bernd Metzner, Hartmut Link, Lothar Kanz and Hans-J. Schmoll

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19971001)80:7<1221::AID-CNCR4>3.0.CO;2-N

      The use of consecutive cycles of high dose ifosfamide plus doxorubicin supported by granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and retransfusion of peripheral blood stem cells is associated with a high response rate in patients with metastatic soft tissue sarcomas. The current Phase I/II study identifies nephrotoxicity as the dose-limiting toxicity at a dose of 16 g/m2 of ifosfamide. This treatment approach should be explored further in a neoadjuvant setting.

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      p53 protein overexpression is common and independent of human papillomavirus infection in squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva (pages 1228–1233)

      Marjolein J. Kagie, Gemma G. Kenter, Rob A. E. M. Tollenaar, Jo Hermans, J. Baptist Trimbos and Gert Jan Fleuren

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19971001)80:7<1228::AID-CNCR5>3.0.CO;2-G

      p53 overexpression is common in both human papillomavirus (HPV) positive and HPV negative carcinomas of the vulva. These findings indicate that p53 overexpression and HPV infection play a role in the pathogenesis of vulvar carcinoma.

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      Surgical pathologic factors that predict recurrence in stage IB and IIA cervical carcinoma patients with negative pelvic lymph nodes (pages 1234–1240)

      Rahul A. K. Samlal, Jacobus van der Velden, Fiebo J. W. Ten Kate, Marten S. Schilthuis, Augustinus A. M. Hart and Frits B. Lammes

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19971001)80:7<1234::AID-CNCR6>3.0.CO;2-K

      Among cervical carcinoma patients with negative pelvic lymph nodes, those with adenocarcinoma and deeply invasive tumors are at risk for recurrence.

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      Identification of allelic losses in benign, borderline, and invasive epithelial ovarian tumors and correlation with clinical outcome (pages 1241–1249)

      Gabriele Saretzki, Uwe Hoffmann, Peter Röhlke, Roland Psille, Thorwald Gaigal, Gisela Keller, Heinz Höfler, Thomas Löning, Iver Petersen and Manfred Dietel

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19971001)80:7<1241::AID-CNCR7>3.0.CO;2-N

      One hundred thirty-two epithelial ovarian tumors (25 benign, 35 borderline, and 72 invasive) were analyzed for allelic losses at 12 chromosomal regions. Allelic losses were not independent predictors of survival but were associated with higher stage.

    5. General Topic

      Pediatric Oncology
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      Expression of the MDR1 gene product P-glycoprotein in childhood neuroblastoma (pages 1250–1257)

      Catharina R. M. Dhooge, Barbara M. J. De Moerloose, Yves C. M. Benoit, Nadine Van Roy, Jan Philippé and Geneviève G. M. Laureys

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19971001)80:7<1250::AID-CNCR8>3.0.CO;2-O

      The prognostic relevance of P-glycoprotein expression in childhood neuroblastoma was not clear from the results of this study. However, the finding that metastatic cells are capable of expressing MDR1, in contrast to the neuroblastoma cells of the primary tumor, would certainly be an interesting topic for further study as work directed at understanding the progression to metastasis continues.

  3. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Review Articles
    3. Original Articles
    4. Communications
    5. Original Articles
    6. Correspondence
    1. General Topic

      President's Cancer Panel
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      Concerns of special populations : Cancer and the aging population—a meeting of the President's Cancer Panel, July 31, 1997 (pages 1258–1260)

      Paul Calabresi and Harold Freeman

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19971001)80:7<1258::AID-CNCR9>3.0.CO;2-G

    2. The American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer and the American Cancer Society
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      The national cancer data base report on race, age, and region variations in prostate cancer treatment (pages 1261–1266)

      Curtis J. Mettlin, Gerald P. Murphy, Myles P. Cunningham and Herman R. Menck

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19971001)80:7<1261::AID-CNCR10>3.0.CO;2-5

      Demographic variations in prostate cancer treatment documented in the National Cancer Data Base are described.

      From the Commission on Cancer at the American College of Surgeons, Chicago, Illinois; and the American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia

  4. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Review Articles
    3. Original Articles
    4. Communications
    5. Original Articles
    6. Correspondence
    1. General Topic

      Aging and Cancer
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      Integrating geriatrics into the subspecialties of internal medicine : Introduction (pages 1267–1269)

      William R. Hazzard and Nancy Woolard

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19971001)80:7<1267::AID-CNCR11>3.0.CO;2-5

      Recognizing the need to educate physicians better in the treatment of a rapidly aging population, the authors have developed a program to integrate the field of geriatrics with subspecialties in internal medicine.

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      Aging and cancer : Geriatric Oncology--Keynote address to the Integrating Geriatrics into Oncology Education (pages 1270–1272)

      B. J. Kennedy

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19971001)80:7<1270::AID-CNCR12>3.0.CO;2-4

      With the increase in the older population, there is an increase in the incidence of cancer. An oncology education retreat was the foundation for integrating geriatrics into oncology education.

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      Cancer burden in the aged : An epidemiologic and demographic overview (pages 1273–1283)

      Rosemary Yancik

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19971001)80:7<1273::AID-CNCR13>3.0.CO;2-4

      Medical professionals will be treating more and more elderly cancer patients as the number of older persons in the U.S. continues to increase. Data on the cancer burden of the elderly provide convincing evidence that stronger ties must be made between geriatric medicine and oncology to meet the current and future needs of this age segment of the population.

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      The biology of aging : The current research agenda (pages 1284–1293)

      William B. Ershler and Dan L. Longo

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19971001)80:7<1284::AID-CNCR14>3.0.CO;2-3

      Current knowledge about the biology of aging is rapidly expanding. Advancements in research exploring the basic processes of aging have revealed mechanisms that relate to age-related diseases, such as cancer, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease.

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      An agenda for clinical research in geriatrics (pages 1294–1301)

      Harvey Jay Cohen

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19971001)80:7<1294::AID-CNCR15>3.0.CO;2-2

      The agenda for clinical research in geriatrics discussed in this article is broad and encompasses the study of disorders and diseases that result in death and/or disability.

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      Aging and pharmacology (pages 1302–1310)

      Robert E. Vestal

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19971001)80:7<1302::AID-CNCR16>3.0.CO;2-B

      In this article, the general state of knowledge regarding geriatric clinical pharmacology is summarized, with emphasis on information relevant to the care of older cancer patients.

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      Geriatric assessment in oncology (pages 1311–1316)

      David B. Reuben

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19971001)80:7<1311::AID-CNCR17>3.0.CO;2-A

      Geriatric assessment extends beyond the traditional medical evaluation of the health of older persons to include assessments of cognitive, affective, functional, social, economic, and environmental status. For healthier seniors, simple probes for the presence of common geriatric problems may suffice, but those who are frail should receive more extensive evaluation conducted by either individual practitioners or a multidisciplinary team.

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      Cancer chemotherapy in the older patient : What the medical oncologist needs to know (pages 1317–1322)

      Lodovico Balducci and Martine Extermann

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19971001)80:7<1317::AID-CNCR18>3.0.CO;2-A

      Older patients may benefit from the individualized treatment of cancer. This involves a comprehensive assessment of the older person, as well as provisions to minimize drug toxicity.

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      Interaction between the physician and the older patient : The oncologist's perspective (pages 1323–1325)

      Patricia A. Ganz

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19971001)80:7<1323::AID-CNCR19>3.0.CO;2-9

      Communicating with older cancer patients is challenging. This article discusses relevant issues and strategies for enhancing the oncologist's communication with the older cancer patient.

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      The impact of age, marital status, and physician-patient interactions on the care of older women with breast carcinoma (pages 1326–1334)

      Rebecca A. Silliman, Susan L. Troyan, Edward Guadagnoli, Sherrie H. Kaplan and Sheldon Greenfield

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19971001)80:7<1326::AID-CNCR20>3.0.CO;2-8

      When older women have been newly diagnosed with breast carcinoma and there is clinical uncertainty as to the most appropriate therapies, patients may be better served if they are offered choices from among definitive therapies. In discussing therapies with them, physicians must be sensitive to their fears and concerns about the monetary costs and functional consequences of treatment in relation to the expected benefits.

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      Palliative medicine in the elderly (pages 1335–1347)

      James F. Cleary and Paul P. Carbone

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19971001)80:7<1335::AID-CNCR21>3.0.CO;2-7

      Symptom management is of critical importance in all components of medical oncology, including the end of life. Older patients, who comprise the majority of cancer patients, are in particular need of the management of symptoms such as pain, fatigue, and dyspnea.

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      Health care economics of cancer in the elderly (pages 1348–1350)

      Joseph S. Bailes

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19971001)80:7<1348::AID-CNCR22>3.0.CO;2-6

      Changing economic and demographic conditions necessitate the strategic repositioning and enhanced training of oncologists.

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      Medical oncology and geriatric medicine : Is it time for fellowship integration? (pages 1351–1353)

      John M. Bennett, Deepak M. Sahasrabudhe and William J. Hall

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19971001)80:7<1351::AID-CNCR23>3.0.CO;2-5

      Sixty percent of all cancers occur in patients age > 65 years. To provide adequate geriatric researchers and educators in oncology, a combined fellowship program is proposed to address the anticipated research and clinical needs.

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      The oncology geriatric education retreat : Commentary and conclusions (pages 1354–1356)

      Harvey Jay Cohen

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19971001)80:7<1354::AID-CNCR24>3.0.CO;2-5

      At a retreat attended by 40 oncologists and geriatricians, mechanisms were discussed by which geriatrics content could be incorporated into oncology training. Clinical and educational activities were suggested, and the importance of having a research agenda to accompany these activities was stressed.

  5. Correspondence

    1. Top of page
    2. Review Articles
    3. Original Articles
    4. Communications
    5. Original Articles
    6. Correspondence
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      "One to three" or "Four or more"? selecting patients for postmastectomy radiation therapy (pages 1357–1362)

      Stanisław Korzeniowski

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19971001)80:7<1357::AID-CNCR25>3.0.CO;2-5

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      Assessment of microsatellite alterations in young patients with gastric adenocarcinoma (pages 1357–1362)

      Raquel Seruca and Manuel Sobrinho-Simões

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19971001)80:7<1358::AID-CNCR26>3.0.CO;2-5

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      Author reply (pages 1357–1362)

      Jeremy D. Hayden and Iain G. Martin

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19971001)80:7<1360::AID-CNCR27>3.0.CO;2-4

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      Association of Stein-Leventhal Syndrome with the incidence of postmenopausal breast carcinoma in a large prospective study of women in Iowa (pages 1357–1362)

      Fabio Parazzini, Carlo La Vecchia, Silvia Franceschi, Renato Talamini, Eva Negri and Pier Giorgio Crosignani

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19971001)80:7<1360::AID-CNCR28>3.0.CO;2-4

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