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Cancer

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Supplement: American Cancer Society National Conference on Purchasing Oncology Services: Current Methods and Models in the Marketplace

15 May 1998

Volume 82, Issue S10

Pages 1989–2080

  1. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Original Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Introduction (pages 1989–1990)

      Myles P. Cunningham

      Version of Record online: 31 OCT 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19980515)82:10+<1989::AID-CNCR1>3.0.CO;2-Z

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      Medicare coverage for oncology services (pages 1991–1994)

      Grant P. Bagley and Karen McVearry

      Version of Record online: 31 OCT 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19980515)82:10+<1991::AID-CNCR2>3.0.CO;2-6

      The Health Care Financing Administration, which is the federal agency that administers the Medicare program, has the responsibility as a leader in the health care industry to establish policies with the purpose of promoting and safeguarding the health of the aged and disabled. This commitment to quality health care is exemplified through Medicare's policies regarding oncology services.

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      The Oregon Health Plan : Development and implementation of an innovative method of delivery of health care services to the medically indigent (pages 1995–1999)

      Andrew Glass

      Version of Record online: 31 OCT 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19980515)82:10+<1995::AID-CNCR3>3.0.CO;2-2

      The Oregon Health Plan uses a prioritized list of health services to provide medical services to the indigent. Cancer services are fully integrated into the prioritized list and are comprehensively provided to the Medicaid population.

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      A government purchaser perspective : TennCare—Strengthening the safety net (pages 2000–2002)

      Wendy J. Long and Denise Kirsch

      Version of Record online: 31 OCT 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19980515)82:10+<2000::AID-CNCR4>3.0.CO;2-G

      Government purchasers of health insurance should focus their efforts on increasing the percentage of the population who are insured, improving access to primary and secondary prevention services, and assuring that all enrollees have access to the full range of covered benefits, as medically necessary.

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      Oncology management by the "new" Veterans Health Administration (pages 2003–2009)

      Nancy J. Wilson and Kenneth W. Kizer

      Version of Record online: 31 OCT 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19980515)82:10+<2003::AID-CNCR5>3.0.CO;2-D

      The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) of the Department of Veterans Affairs is making unprecedented efforts to prevent and treat cancer, and many of the current screening interventions already exceed the U.S. Public Health Service Healthy People 2000 goals.

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      Oncology services : The Department of Defense perspective (pages 2010–2015)

      Doris Browne, Lynn M. Baatz, Fred Millard and Frank T. Ward

      Version of Record online: 31 OCT 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19980515)82:10+<2010::AID-CNCR6>3.0.CO;2-G

      Government purchasers should consider managed care plans with multiple benefits options and employ evidence-based outcomes measures. In addition, cancer care should be holistic with provisions from screening and prevention to treatment and include psychosocial and educational components.

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      Performance measurement in cancer care : Uses and challenges (pages 2016–2021)

      Gary S. Lazar and Christopher E. Desch

      Version of Record online: 31 OCT 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19980515)82:10+<2016::AID-CNCR7>3.0.CO;2-A

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      Performance measurement with the use of administrative data sets can influence medical decision-making and improve the quality of care provided to cancer patients. Purchasers of care should take a leadership role in creating data sets that will enhance clinical performance.

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      Using the tail to wag the dog : A Consumer's perspective on management of the cost of cancer (pages 2022–2025)

      Robert A. Reid

      Version of Record online: 31 OCT 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19980515)82:10+<2022::AID-CNCR8>3.0.CO;2-E

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      The time to most effectively manage the cost of cancer is in the years before cancer occurs. Once cancer occurs, an insurance plan should generously, and without bureaucratic oversight, pay for the person's struggle to regain health.

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      Collaborative approaches to purchasing and managing oncology services for a prepaid population (pages 2026–2034)

      Mary N. Hennings, David S. Rosenthal, Debra A. Connolly, Marc N. Pollack and Maureen M. Lynch

      Version of Record online: 31 OCT 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19980515)82:10+<2026::AID-CNCR9>3.0.CO;2-A

      Recognizing that managed care now is the predominant form of health insurance plan in the U.S., the authors offer an example of how such plans successfully can collaborate with oncology care providers in the best interest of the patient.

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      What the private sector does not know about purchasing oncology services (pages 2035–2038)

      Dale Orred

      Version of Record online: 31 OCT 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19980515)82:10+<2035::AID-CNCR10>3.0.CO;2-C

      Private sector purchasers of health care generally do not have the time or medical knowledge to develop and use meaningful sophisticated information regarding network oncologic care. To better understand this specialty, purchasers need access to prevention protocols, success rates of various treatment modalities, remission data, and supportive therapy in a format that recognizes the purchaser's cultural values and information needs.

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      Oncology services for members of a national managed care company (pages 2039–2042)

      Harold Zarkowsky

      Version of Record online: 31 OCT 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19980515)82:10+<2039::AID-CNCR11>3.0.CO;2-C

      Complete oncology services can be provided in a managed care setting with value-added services and coverage of most clinical trials.

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      The Henry Ford Health System (pages 2043–2046)

      Raymond Y. Demers, Robert A. Chapman, Michael H. Flasch, Cheryl Martin, Bruce D. McCarthy and Steven Nelson

      Version of Record online: 31 OCT 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19980515)82:10+<2043::AID-CNCR12>3.0.CO;2-B

      This article describes a cancer program within a regionally based, vertically integrated health system. Key advantages for purchasers include a managed care approach, electronic systemwide information systems, a population perspective with priorities in prevention, quality assessment, and outcomes measurement.

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      Overall survival of the medical oncologist : A new outcome measurement in cancer medicine (pages 2047–2056)

      Bruce Feinberg and Iris Feinberg

      Version of Record online: 31 OCT 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19980515)82:10+<2047::AID-CNCR13>3.0.CO;2-B

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      Integrated oncologic service corporations offer a more accessible, cost-efficient, high quality solution for cancer care that preserves the role of the clinician in patient care decision-making while maintaining the clinical and financial autonomy of the private practice oncologist.

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      The National Comprehensive Cancer Network : Present and future directions (pages 2057–2060)

      William T. McGivney

      Version of Record online: 31 OCT 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19980515)82:10+<2057::AID-CNCR14>3.0.CO;2-A

      The National Comprehensive Cancer Network is forming partnerships with managed care companies in the guideline/data base area to facilitate the delivery of more effective and efficient care in oncology.

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      How to judge the cancer services benefit component of your health insurance plan (pages 2061–2067)

      Lee E. Mortenson

      Version of Record online: 31 OCT 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19980515)82:10+<2061::AID-CNCR15>3.0.CO;2-9

      Businesses and the oncology community vary in their criteria for evaluation of quality cancer care. Using Donabedian's classic quality evaluation model of structure-process-outcomes, the two groups can establish a set of criteria that are useful, available, and informative for the decision-making process.

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      Managed oncology care : The disease management model (pages 2068–2075)

      Lawrence Piro and Jonathan Doctor

      Version of Record online: 31 OCT 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19980515)82:10+<2068::AID-CNCR16>3.0.CO;2-9

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      Given the high cost and significant variability in cancer treatment today, the cancer disease management approach is essential to yielding advantages in cost, quality, and outcomes.

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      Delivery of comprehensive cancer care at Kaiser Permanente (pages 2076–2080)

      Andrew Glass

      Version of Record online: 31 OCT 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19980515)82:10+<2076::AID-CNCR17>3.0.CO;2-8

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      Cancer care at Kaiser Permanente forms an integral part of this comprehensive medical care system. Evidence-based guidelines, modern treatment methods, and research in the public domain constitute essential parts of the entire effort.

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