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Cancer

Cover image for Cancer

1 January 2000

Volume 88, Issue 1

Pages 1–244

  1. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Commentary
    4. Review Article
    5. Original Articles
    6. Correspondence
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      CANCER launches accelerated publication: a message from the editor-in-chief (page 1)

      Robert V. P. Hutter

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(20000101)88:1<1::AID-CNCR1>3.0.CO;2-O

  2. Commentary

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Commentary
    4. Review Article
    5. Original Articles
    6. Correspondence
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      The new millennium : Applying novel technology to the study of the cancer cell in situ (pages 2–5)

      Monica R. Brown, Elise C. Kohn and Robert V. P. Hutter

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(20000101)88:1<2::AID-CNCR2>3.0.CO;2-K

      Studying cancer cells and their microenvironments in situ is necessary to understand the contribution of each cell to the process of carcinogenesis. In the next millennium, oncologists may have the ability to identify and manipulate preclinical molecular changes within cells to obviate or reverse precancerous transformations.

  3. Review Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Commentary
    4. Review Article
    5. Original Articles
    6. Correspondence
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      Oral bisphosphonates : A review of clinical use in patients with bone metastases (pages 6–14)

      Pierre P. Major, Allan Lipton, James Berenson and Gabriel Hortobagyi

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(20000101)88:1<6::AID-CNCR3>3.0.CO;2-D

      Orally administered bisphosphonates have not shown convincing clinical benefit in cancer metastatic to bone. In several trials, the trial design and statistical methodology are flawed.

  4. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Commentary
    4. Review Article
    5. Original Articles
    6. Correspondence
    1. Anatomic Site

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      Kaposi sarcoma of major salivary gland origin : A clinicopathologic series of six cases (pages 15–23)

      James T. Castle and Lester D. R. Thompson

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(20000101)88:1<15::AID-CNCR4>3.0.CO;2-0

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      Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a neoplasm of endothelial origin encountered in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Salivary gland involvement by KS should be considered when diagnosing HIV positive patients with salivary gland enlargement.

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      Fhit expression in gastric adenocarcinoma : Correlation with disease stage and survival (pages 24–34)

      David Capuzzi, Emanuele Santoro, Walter W. Hauck, Albert J. Kovatich, Francis E. Rosato, Raffaele Baffa, Kay Huebner and Peter A. McCue

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(20000101)88:1<24::AID-CNCR5>3.0.CO;2-W

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      In the current study, loss of Fhit protein in gastric adenocarcinoma appeared to occur significantly more frequently in high stage and high histologic grade tumors but was not correlated with p21, p53, erb B2, calmodulin, or CD44 variant expression. The absence of Fhit expression was associated with shorter survival (P = 0.017), perhaps driven by the significant association between high stage and shorter survival (P = 0.003).

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      Time-dependency of the prognostic effect of carcinoembryonic antigen and p53 protein in colorectal adenocarcinoma (pages 35–41)

      Manuel Díez, Marina Pollán, Jose M. Müguerza, Maria J. Gaspar, Antonio M. Duce, María J. Alvarez, Tomás Ratia, Pilar Hernández, Antonio Ruiz and Javier Granell

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(20000101)88:1<35::AID-CNCR6>3.0.CO;2-P

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      Preoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and immunohistochemical expression of p53 was found to have an effect on disease recurrence that varied with time. Although an elevated preoperative CEA level was an indicator of a high risk of recurrence only during the first 2 years after surgery, the presence of p53 immunoreactivity in the primary tumor was an indicator of a high risk of recurrence only after the first year. The effect of time-dependency in the prediction of preoperative prognostic parameters should be taken into consideration when establishing estimations for the postoperative course.

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      Expression of platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor correlates with good prognosis in patients with colorectal carcinoma (pages 42–49)

      Shinsuke Saito, Nelson Tsuno, Hirokazu Nagawa, Eiji Sunami, Jin Zhengxi, Takuya Osada, Joji Kitayama, Yoichi Shibata, Takashi Tsuruo and Tetsuichiro Muto

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(20000101)88:1<42::AID-CNCR7>3.0.CO;2-M

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      The results of the current study show that platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor expression correlates with a good prognosis in patients with colorectal carcinoma.

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      A prognostic index of the survival of patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (pages 50–57)

      Laura Lladó, Joan Virgili, Joan Figueras, Carles Valls, Joan Dominguez, Antoni Rafecas, Jaume Torras, Joan Fabregat, Jordi Guardiola and Eduardo Jaurrieta

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(20000101)88:1<50::AID-CNCR8>3.0.CO;2-I

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      The prognostic index described is useful for selecting patients as candidates for palliative treatment with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) and for predicting the survival of patients with extensive hepatocellular carcinoma treated with TACE.

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      The effect of retreatment with interferon-α on the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with chronic hepatitis C (pages 58–65)

      Hidenori Toyoda, Takashi Kumada, Satoshi Nakano, Isao Takeda, Keiichi Sugiyama, Seiki Kiriyama, Yasuhiro Sone and Yasuhiro Hisanaga

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(20000101)88:1<58::AID-CNCR9>3.0.CO;2-7

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      Retreatment of patients with chronic hepatitis C with interferon-α has the effect of suppressing the development of hepatocellular carcinoma, in addition to the effect of the initial interferon-α course, in patients who do not have complete responses to the initial treatment. This is the case even when a clearance of hepatitis C virus is not achieved with retreatment. Further prospective study is required.

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      Salvage surgery for patients with recurrent gastrointestinal sarcoma : Prognostic factors to guide patient selection (pages 66–74)

      Satvinder S. Mudan, Kevin C. Conlon, James M. Woodruff, Jonathan J. Lewis and Murray F. Brennan

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(20000101)88:1<66::AID-CNCR10>3.0.CO;2-0

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      Outcomes for patients with recurrent gastrointestinal sarcoma are determined by the tumor biology. Candidates for surgery are best identified by a long disease free interval; otherwise, surgery should be reserved for symptom control.

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      Increased CA 125 serum levels in patients with advanced acute leukemia with serosal involvement (pages 75–78)

      Andrea Camera, Maria Rosaria Villa, Stefano Rocco, Tiziana De Novellis, Silvia Costantini, Luca Pezzullo, Anna Lucania, Angela Mariano, Vincenzo Macchia and Bruno Rotoli

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(20000101)88:1<75::AID-CNCR11>3.0.CO;2-#

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      Elevated serum CA 125 levels may occur in patients with advanced acute leukemia with serosal involvement. In the current study in vitro culture of leukemic cells failed to show CA 125 production; thus in leukemic patients CA 125 indicates a serosal inflammatory reaction secondary to leukemic infiltration.

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      Paclitaxel and tamoxifen : An active regimen for patients with metastatic melanoma (pages 79–87)

      Faith E. Nathan, David Berd, Takami Sato and Michael J. Mastrangelo

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(20000101)88:1<79::AID-CNCR12>3.0.CO;2-L

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      In this Phase II trial, paclitaxel (225 mg/m2 over 3 hours every 3 weeks) and tamoxifen (40 mg daily) showed activity in metastatic melanoma. A 24% response rate was observed among 21 previously treated patients with metastatic cutaneous or mucosal melanoma.

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      Locally advanced melanoma : Results of postoperative hypofractionated radiation therapy (pages 88–94)

      Graham Stevens, John F. Thompson, Ian Firth, Christopher J. O'Brien, William H. McCarthy and Michael J. Quinn

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(20000101)88:1<88::AID-CNCR13>3.0.CO;2-K

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      For patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic melanoma, postoperative radiation therapy given according to a hypofractionated schedule reduces the incidence of local recurrence, compared with the results of published surgical series.

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      Outcome of patients with metastatic breast carcinoma treated at a private medical oncology clinic (pages 95–107)

      William F. Anderson, James E. Reeves, Abdalla Elias and Hans (J) Berkel

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(20000101)88:1<95::AID-CNCR14>3.0.CO;2-P

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      Despite decades of clinical research, metastatic breast carcinoma remains a fatal disease. In the author' private medical oncology clinic, patient outcome was similar to survival times reported from clinical trials and did not differ significantly from that of untreated historical controls.

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      A high number of tumor free axillary lymph nodes from patients with lymph node negative breast carcinoma is associated with poor outcome (pages 108–113)

      Robert L. Camp, Eric B. Rimm and David L. Rimm

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(20000101)88:1<108::AID-CNCR15>3.0.CO;2-B

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      The number of tumor free draining lymph nodes in cases of lymph node negative breast carcinoma is independently predictive of poor outcome and is associated with tumor necrosis.

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      Racial differences in breast carcinoma survival (pages 114–123)

      Sue A. Joslyn and Michele M. West

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(20000101)88:1<114::AID-CNCR16>3.0.CO;2-J

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      National breast carcinoma surveillance data from 1988–1995 reveal that African American women were diagnosed with breast carcinoma at significantly younger ages and later stages and were more likely to have hormone receptor negative tumors and more invasive histologic tumor types compared with white women. Survival for African American women was significantly worse, even after controlling for racial differences in patient age, tumor stage, hormone receptor status, and tumor histology.

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      A phase II study of paclitaxel plus carboplatin as first-line chemotherapy for women with metastatic breast carcinoma (pages 124–131)

      Edith A. Perez, David W. Hillman, Philip J. Stella, James E. Krook, Lynn C. Hartmann, Tom R. Fitch, Alan K. Hatfield, James A. Mailliard, Suresh Nair, Carl G. Kardinal and James N. Ingle

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(20000101)88:1<124::AID-CNCR17>3.0.CO;2-F

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      The combination of paclitaxel and carboplatin has substantial activity in patients with metastatic breast carcinoma, with an overall response rate of 62% and 1-year estimated survival of 72%. Further evaluations of the regimen and the potential benefit of adding anti-HER2 antibody are warranted.

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      Bax and Bcl-2 protein expression following radiation therapy versus radiation plus thermoradiotherapy in stage IIIB cervical carcinoma (pages 132–138)

      Yoko Harima, Kenji Nagata, Keizo Harima, Atsutoshi Oka, Valentina V. Ostapenko, Nobuaki Shikata, Takeo Ohnishi and Yoshimasa Tanaka

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(20000101)88:1<132::AID-CNCR18>3.0.CO;2-H

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      Thermoradiotherapy for patients with AJCC/UICC Stage IIIB cervical carcinoma can induce an additive or synergistic antitumor effect through apoptosis involving one of the bax pathways.

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      Does hysteroscopy facilitate tumor cell dissemination? : Incidence of peritoneal cytology from patients with early stage endometrial carcinoma following dilatation and curettage (D & C) versus hysteroscopy and D & C (pages 139–143)

      Andreas Obermair, Magda Geramou, Fatih Gucer, Ursula Denison, Anton H. Graf, Elisabeth Kapshammer, Walter Neunteufel, Inge Frech, Alexandra Kaider and Christian Kainz

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(20000101)88:1<139::AID-CNCR19>3.0.CO;2-U

      A significantly higher incidence of positive peritoneal cytology was found in patients with early stage endometrial carcinoma who underwent fluid hysteroscopy plus dilatation and curettage (D & C) prior to staging laparotomy, compared with patients who had only D & C.

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      The role of secondary cytoreductive surgery in the treatment of patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian carcinoma (pages 144–153)

      Scott M. Eisenkop, Richard L. Friedman and Nick M. Spirtos

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(20000101)88:1<144::AID-CNCR20>3.0.CO;2-X

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      Secondary cytoreductive surgery for recurrent epithelial ovarian carcinoma improves survival, especially if given before salvage chemotherapy.

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      Testicular lymphoma is associated with a high incidence of extranodal recurrence (pages 154–161)

      Rafael Fonseca, Thomas M. Habermann, Joseph P. Colgan, Brian P. O'Neill, William L. White, Thomas E. Witzig, Kathleen S. Egan, James A. Martenson, Lawrence J. Burgart and David J. Inwards

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(20000101)88:1<154::AID-CNCR21>3.0.CO;2-T

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      Testicular lymphoma is a unique, aggressive, extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The risk of extranodal recurrence is high, and better treatment is needed to prevent recurrence.

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      Tumor markers at the time of recurrence in patients with germ cell tumors (pages 162–168)

      José M. Trigo, José M. Tabernero, Luis Paz-Ares, José L. García-Llano, José Mora, Pilar Lianes, Emilio Esteban, Ramón Salazar, Juan J. López-López and Hernán Cortés-Funes

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(20000101)88:1<162::AID-CNCR22>3.0.CO;2-V

      The results of this retrospective study indicate that tumor marker status at diagnosis is a poor guide to marker status at recurrence in patients with germ cell tumors. Early detection of recurrence should not rely only on marker levels, even for those patients with elevated levels at the time of diagnosis.

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      Chemotherapy in patients with recurrent and progressive central neurocytoma (pages 169–174)

      Alba A. Brandes, Pietro Amistà, Marina Gardiman, Lorenzo Volpin, Daniela Danieli, Bianca Guglielmi, Carla Carollo, Gianpietro Pinna, Sergio Turazzi and Silvio Monfardini

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(20000101)88:1<169::AID-CNCR23>3.0.CO;2-7

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      Central neurocytoma is a rare tumor that generally is curable by surgery. For the sporadic cases of recurrence developing after radical surgery, radiotherapy is the standard treatment. In patients with further progression of disease, stabilization may be obtained with chemotherapy.

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      Lymph node metastases : The importance of the microenvironment (pages 175–179)

      Alessandro D. Santin

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(20000101)88:1<175::AID-CNCR24>3.0.CO;2-F

      Regional lymph nodes constitute the primary sites where the specific recognition of tumor antigens and the proper activation of the immune system take place.

    22. General Topic

      Chemotherapy: Solid Tumor Metastases
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      A phase I study of gemcitabine and docetaxel in patients with metastatic solid tumors (pages 180–185)

      David P. Ryan, Thomas J. Lynch, Michael L. Grossbard, Michael V. Seiden, Charles S. Fuchs, Nina Grenon, Paul Baccala, Deborah Berg, Dianne Finkelstein, Robert J. Mayer and Jeffrey W. Clark

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(20000101)88:1<180::AID-CNCR25>3.0.CO;2-Q

      The maximum tolerated dose for this drug combination was found to be docetaxel, 60 mg/m2, on Day 1 and gemcitabine, 600 mg/m2, on Days 1, 8, and 15 every 28 days.

    23. Pediatric Oncology
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      Large cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma of childhood : Analysis of 78 consecutive patients enrolled in 2 consecutive protocols at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (pages 186–197)

      Jaume Mora, Daniel A. Filippa, Howard T. Thaler, Tatyana Polyak, Milicent L. Cranor and Norma Wollner

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(20000101)88:1<186::AID-CNCR26>3.0.CO;2-5

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      A disease free survival rate of 72% was obtained in 78 consecutive patients with advanced stage diffuse large cell lymphoma using a uniform treatment approach (LSA2-L2 and LSA4 regimens) over a period of 25 years at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center.

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      Hemangiopericytoma in children and infants (pages 198–204)

      Carlos Rodriguez-Galindo, Kirk Ramsey, Jesse J. Jenkins, Catherine A. Poquette, Sue C. Kaste, Thomas E. Merchant, Bhaskar N. Rao, Charles B. Pratt and Alberto S. Pappo

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(20000101)88:1<198::AID-CNCR27>3.0.CO;2-W

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      Childhood hemangiopericytoma comprises two distinct clinical entities. Infantile hemangiopericytoma, although indistinguishable from its adult counterpart, is characterized by benign clinical behavior, whereas hemangiopericytoma presenting in older children does not differ from adult hemangiopericytoma. The distinction between both entities is of great importance for adequate management.

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      Effective preventive central nervous system therapy with extended triple intrathecal therapy and the modified ALL-BFM 86 chemotherapy program in an enlarged non-high risk group of children and adolescents with non-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia : The ISRAEL National Study report (pages 205–216)

      Batia Stark, Rivka Sharon, Gideon Rechavi, Dina Attias, Ami Ballin, Gabriel Cividalli, Yoav Burstein, Dalia Sthoeger, Ayala Abramov and Rina Zaizov

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(20000101)88:1<205::AID-CNCR28>3.0.CO;2-7

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      Extended triple intrathecal therapy without cranial radiation can provide adequate central nervous system prophylaxis for the majority of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the context of modified systemic Berlin–Frankfurt–Munster therapy.

    26. Quality of Life
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      Evaluation of an instrument to assess the needs of patients with cancer (pages 217–225)

      Billie Bonevski, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Afaf Girgis, Louise Burton, Peter Cook, Allison Boyes and the Supportive Care Review Group

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(20000101)88:1<217::AID-CNCR29>3.0.CO;2-Y

      The findings of this study suggest that the Supportive Care Needs Survey is a reliable and valid measure of the needs of oncology patients in the areas of psychologic, health system and information, physical and daily living, patient care and support, and sexuality. The standardized and widespread application of this instrument is recommended.

      See also pages 226–37.

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      The unmet supportive care needs of patients with cancer (pages 226–237)

      Rob Sanson-Fisher, Afaf Girgis, Allison Boyes, Billie Bonevski, Louise Burton, Peter Cook and Supportive Care Review Group

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(20000101)88:1<226::AID-CNCR30>3.0.CO;2-P

      The findings of this study suggest that cancer patients experience high levels of unmet supportive care needs, particularly in the psychologic, health system and information, and physical and daily living domains. Subgroups of patients with unmet needs in particular areas were identified, providing a foundation for the development and testing of interventions tailored to address these needs.

      See also pages 217–225.

  5. Correspondence

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Commentary
    4. Review Article
    5. Original Articles
    6. Correspondence
    1. General Topic

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      The prognostic significance of amplification and overexpression of c-met and c-erb B-2 in human gastric carcinomas (pages 238–239)

      Fátima Carneiro and Manuel Sobrinho-Simões

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(20000101)88:1<238::AID-CNCR31>3.0.CO;2-F

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      Author reply (pages 239–240)

      Masakazu Nakajima

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(20000101)88:1<239::AID-CNCR32>3.0.CO;2-9

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      Extramedullary plasmacytoma : tumor occurrence and therapeutic concepts (pages 240–241)

      Nilüfer Güler

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(20000101)88:1<240::AID-CNCR33>3.0.CO;2-W

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      Author reply (pages 241–242)

      Christoph Alexiou and Wolfgang Arnold

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(20000101)88:1<241::AID-CNCR34>3.0.CO;2-Q

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      Pathologic findings from the national surgical adjuvant breast project (NSABP) eight-year update of protocol B-17 (pages 242–243)

      Melvin J. Silverstein and Michael D. Lagios

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(20000101)88:1<242::AID-CNCR35>3.0.CO;2-K

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      Author reply (pages 243–244)

      Edwin R. Fisher

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2000 | DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(20000101)88:1<243::AID-CNCR36>3.0.CO;2-E

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