Evidence that fibroblast growth factors 1 and 4 participate in regulation of cardiogenesis

Authors

  • Xiaolei Zhu,

    1. Department of Cellular Biology and Anatomy and Cardiovascular Research Center, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226
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  • Joachim Sasse,

    1. Research Department Shriners Hospital for Crippled Children, Tampa, Florida 33612
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  • Donna McAllister,

    1. Department of Cellular Biology and Anatomy and Cardiovascular Research Center, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226
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  • John Lough

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Cellular Biology and Anatomy and Cardiovascular Research Center, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226
    • Department of Cellular Biology and Anatomy, Medical College of Wisconsin, 8701 W. Watertown Plank Road, Milwaukee, WI 53226
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Abstract

Previous studies in this laboratory have indicated that the early embryonic chick heart depends on fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2; bFGF), sequentially utilized in paracrine and autocrine fashion, for its growth and development (Sugi and Lough, [1995] Dev. Biol. 168:667–574). This view emanated from immunohistochemical detection of FGF-like antigens in endoderm cells at stage 6, and later in the early myocardium at stage 9 + (Parlow et al. [1991] Dev. Biol. 146:139–147). To identify other members of the FGF family that are expressed by these cells, we have used peptide-generated antisera that specifically recognize FGFs 1 and 4. Like FGF-2, FGFs 1 and 4 were exclusively detected in the endoderm at stage 5 + and later in the myocardium, appearing as punctate cytoplasmic deposits. However, whereas FGF-2 is first detected at stage 9 +, FGFs 1 and 4 did not appear until stages 11 and 15, respectively. Expression of all FGFs peaked at stages 18–24, decreasing thereafter in parallel with reduced myocardial cell proliferation. To determine these isoproteins' ability to facilitate the completion of terminal cardiac myocyte differentiation, stage 5+ precardiac mesoderm was cultured in defined medium with purified FGFs. Like FGF-2, as little as 5–10 ng/ml FGF-1 or FGF-4 supported the proliferation and differentiation of precardiac myoblasts, resulting in the formation of a vesicle containing an adherent multilayer of synchronously contractile cells. Evidence that this represented FGF receptor-mediated signaling rather than a nonspecific effect of exogenous FGF was indicated by the ability of sodium chlorate to inhibit FGF-mediated cardiogenesis. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that, like FGF-2, FGFs 1 and 4 participate in the regulation of early heart development via paracrine and autocrine mechanisms. © 1996 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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