Fall-related occupational injuries on farms

Authors

  • David L. Nordstrom MS, MPH,

    Corresponding author
    1. Departments of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and National Farm Medicine Center Department, Marshfield Medical Research and Education Foundation, Marshfield, WI
    • Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Marshfield Medical Research and Education Foundation, 1000 North Oak Avenue, Marshfield, WI 54449
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  • Peter M. Layde MD,

    1. Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI
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  • Kurt A. Olson MS,

    1. Departments of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and National Farm Medicine Center Department, Marshfield Medical Research and Education Foundation, Marshfield, WI
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  • Dean Stueland MD,

    1. Departments of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and National Farm Medicine Center Department, Marshfield Medical Research and Education Foundation, Marshfield, WI
    2. Department of Emergency Medicine, Marshfield Clinic, Marshfield, WI
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  • Marilyn A. Follen RN,

    1. Departments of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and National Farm Medicine Center Department, Marshfield Medical Research and Education Foundation, Marshfield, WI
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  • Laura Brand

    1. Departments of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and National Farm Medicine Center Department, Marshfield Medical Research and Education Foundation, Marshfield, WI
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Abstract

We assessed risk factors for fall-related farm injuries in a population-based, case-control study. Cases had to reside in a defined geographic region served by a single medical center. Multiple sources reported cases, and a special farm census enabled random selection of controls. The annual risk of farm fall injury was 7.5 (95% CI: 5.7, 10.0) per 1,000 person-years. The crude incidence rate was higher in men, while the rate based on hours of farmwork was higher in women. In a multivariate analysis of risk factors, three factors were significantly associated with the risk. The risk of fall injury increased 2% (95% CI: 1%, 4%) per hour worked. Residents of farms with some farm workers not living on the farm had a fall injury rate 2.5 (95% CI: 1.0, 6.2) times greater than residents of other farms. Residents of farms with registered cows had one-third (95% CI: 0.14, 0.93) the risk of residents of other farms. To identify environmental hazards for fall injuries, researchers from several disciplines may need to collaborate in the design and conduct of studies that include injury site investigations. © 1996 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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