Hedonics of binge eating in women with bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder

Authors

  • James E. Mitchell,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Neuroscience, Neuropsychiatric Research Institute and the University of North Dakota, Fargo, North Dakota
    • Neuropsychiatric Research Institute, 700 First Avenue South, P.O. Box 1415, Fargo, ND 58107-1415
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  • Melissa Pederson Mussell,

    1. The Eating Disorders Research Program, Department of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota
    2. Department of Professional Psychology, St. Thomas University, St. Paul, Minnesota
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  • Carol B. Peterson,

    1. The Eating Disorders Research Program, Department of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota
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  • Scott Crow,

    1. The Eating Disorders Research Program, Department of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota
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  • Stephen A. Wonderlich,

    1. Department of Neuroscience, Neuropsychiatric Research Institute and the University of North Dakota, Fargo, North Dakota
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  • Ross D. Crosby,

    1. Department of Neuroscience, Neuropsychiatric Research Institute and the University of North Dakota, Fargo, North Dakota
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  • Traci Davis,

    1. The Eating Disorders Research Program, Department of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota
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  • Chris Weller

    1. The Eating Disorders Research Program, Department of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota
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Abstract

Objective

Potential differences in the hedonics of binge eating between female subjects with bulimia nervosa (BN) and female subjects with binge eating disorder (BED) were examined.

Method

Women seeking treatment for BN (N = 29) and BED (N = 49) completed the Eating Hedonics Questionnaire.

Results

Subjects in both groups reported similar precipitants and levels of distress associated with binge eating. Of interest, BED subjects were more likely to report that they enjoyed the food, the taste of the food, the smell and the texture of the food while binge eating. In addition, the BED group reported more relaxation and less physical discomfort and anxiety as a consequence of binge eating compared to the BN group.

Discussion

There are interesting and potentially important differences between individuals with BN and BED in the cognitions and behaviors associated with binge eating. © 1999 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Int J Eat Disord 26: 165–170, 1999.

Ancillary