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Imprinting and behavior

Part 1. Genetics

1.3. Epigenetics

Short Specialist Review

  1. James P. Curley,
  2. Eric B. Keverne

Published Online: 15 OCT 2004

DOI: 10.1002/047001153X.g103315

Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics

Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics

How to Cite

Curley, J. P. and Keverne, E. B. 2004. Imprinting and behavior. Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics. 1:1.3:39.

Author Information

  1. University of Cambridge, Madingley, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 OCT 2004

Abstract

There is accumulating evidence for the role of imprinted genes in the regulation of mammalian behavior. Many imprinted genes are expressed in the brain and are important for its development. In particular, it appears that paternally and maternally expressed genes are critical for the normal development of the hypothalamus/limbic system and cortex/striatum respectively. Furthermore, several imprinted genes have been identified as candidate genes for human behavioral disorders. More recent research has focused on the behavioral phenotypic effects in mice carrying targeted mutations of specific imprinted genes. Two of these, the paternally expressed Mest/Peg1 and Peg3 genes, have been shown to regulate maternal care.

Keywords:

  • genomic imprinting;
  • imprinted genes;
  • behavior;
  • UPD;
  • hybrids;
  • chimeras;
  • Peg3;
  • Peg1;
  • maternal care