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Choices in gene mapping: populations and family structures

Part 1. Genetics

1.4. Gene Mapping

Short Specialist Review

  1. Toni I. Pollin,
  2. Jeffrey R. O'Connell

Published Online: 15 JUL 2005

DOI: 10.1002/047001153X.g104308

Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics

Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics

How to Cite

Pollin, T. I. and O'Connell, J. R. 2005. Choices in gene mapping: populations and family structures. Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics. 1:1.4:51.

Author Information

  1. University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 JUL 2005

Abstract

There are many choices of population for gene mapping of complex diseases. Recent technological advances for genotyping single-nucleotide polymorphisms have shifted our focus from family-based gene mapping to large case-control genome-wide linkage disequilibrium mapping. However, genetic isolates remain an important resource for mapping complex diseases, as these populations have greater genetic and environmental homogeneity. In addition, emerging single-molecule genotyping technologies will eliminate the current computational barriers of both linkage and association mapping in the rich extended pedigrees found in genetic isolates. These technologies will reaffirm the importance of genetic isolates for mapping susceptibility genes for complex diseases.

Keywords:

  • complex diseases;
  • genetic isolates;
  • molecular haplotypes;
  • homozygosity mapping;
  • linkage analysis;
  • linkage disequilibrium