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Alternative splicing: conservation and function

Part 2. Genomics

2.3. The Human Genome

Short Specialist Review

  1. Mikhail S. Gelfand1,
  2. Evgenia V. Kriventseva2

Published Online: 15 OCT 2004

DOI: 10.1002/047001153X.g203313

Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics

Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics

How to Cite

Gelfand, M. S. and Kriventseva, E. V. 2004. Alternative splicing: conservation and function. Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics. 2:2.3:30.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Institute for Information Transmission Problems, Moscow, Russia

  2. 2

    BASF Plant Science GmbH, Ludwigshafen, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 OCT 2004

Abstract

A major role in the analysis of alternative splicing belongs to the large-scale computational examination of available EST and genome data. At least half of human genes are alternatively spliced, and many of them have isoforms not conserved in mouse. Alternative splicing tends to shuffle protein domains and frequently affects signal peptides and functional sites within domains. Thus, alternative splicing is a major mechanism generating functional and evolutional diversity of proteins. On the other hand, unlike simple gene duplication, this mechanism allows for the production of absolutely identical, in some parts, proteins.

Keywords:

  • alternative splicing;
  • evolution;
  • isoform;
  • exon–intron structure;
  • protein function;
  • human genome;
  • mouse genome