Standard Article

Systematic mutagenesis of nonmammalian model species

Part 2. Genomics

2.4. Model Organisms: Functional and Comparative Genomics

Specialist Review

  1. Marcel van den Heuvel,
  2. David Sattelle

Published Online: 15 NOV 2005

DOI: 10.1002/047001153X.g204214

Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics

Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics

How to Cite

van den Heuvel, M. and Sattelle, D. 2005. Systematic mutagenesis of nonmammalian model species. Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics. 2:2.4:42.

Author Information

  1. University of Oxford, Oxford, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 NOV 2005

Abstract

The recent accumulation of whole-genome sequence information has led to the notion that the degree of evolutionary conservation between diverse organisms is very high. The number of genes going from a fly to human is only about twofold, and many of these “new” genes are duplicates of genes already existing, not novel genes. This in fact means that organisms that have been thoroughly studied using genetics offer a direct entrance into the function of highly conserved genes. Two of such organisms stand out because of the sophistication and thoroughness of the studies, the worm, Caenorhabditis elegans, and the fly, Drosophila melanogaster. This review attempts to give these two organisms a place in the current drive in gene function analysis.

Keywords:

  • gene function;
  • Drosophila melanogaster;
  • Caenorhabditis elegans;
  • historical perspective;
  • mutagenesis screens