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The Fugu and Zebrafish genomes

Part 2. Genomics

2.4. Model Organisms: Functional and Comparative Genomics

Short Specialist Review

  1. Greg Elgar

Published Online: 15 JUL 2005

DOI: 10.1002/047001153X.g204303

Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics

Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics

How to Cite

Elgar, G. 2005. The Fugu and Zebrafish genomes. Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics.

Author Information

  1. MRC Rosalind Franklin Centre for Genomic Research, Cambridge, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 JUL 2005

Abstract

Ray-finned fish comprise the most abundant class of vertebrates with over 20 000 different species covering almost every aquatic habitat on Earth. They represent a tremendously diverse evolutionary range, having evolved from a common ancestor as far back as 450 million years ago, at around the same time they split from the lobe-finned lineage that led to the tetrapods, including amphibians, birds, reptiles, and mammals. While there is a considerable amount of genomic and genetic data for a number of fish species, two have been particularly well studied at the genome level, the zebrafish, Danio rerio, and the Pufferfish, Fugu rubripes (Fugu). Interestingly, these two fish are only distantly related, each having its own unique characteristics, and this has resulted in them being exploited in quite different ways by molecular biologists.

Keywords:

  • comparative genomics;
  • genome duplication;
  • evolution;
  • sequence;
  • teleost