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History of genetic mapping

Part 2. Genomics

2.6. SNPs/Haplotypes

Introductory Review

  1. Newton E. Morton

Published Online: 15 OCT 2004

DOI: 10.1002/047001153X.g206109

Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics

Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics

How to Cite

Morton, N. E. 2004. History of genetic mapping. Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics. 2:2.6:67.

Author Information

  1. University of Southampton, Southampton, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 OCT 2004

Abstract

Unlike physical maps, genetic maps are not directly derived from the DNA sequence. There are two types of genetic maps based on linkage and allelic association (linkage disequilibrium), respectively. Linkage maps are a century old and their use is stable, performing well in assigning a gene of unknown structure and function to a broad candidate region. Association maps were impossible until a trustworthy physical map became available and the block structure of linkage disequilibrium became known. Their use is in rapid evolution because (like functional tests) they are more efficient than linkage in identifying a causal locus within a candidate region. The questions raised by association mapping, although too new to be found in textbooks, are being pursued by many investigators.

Keywords:

  • linkage;
  • association;
  • linkage disequilibrium