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SNPs and human history

Part 2. Genomics

2.6. SNPs/Haplotypes

Specialist Review

  1. Jeffrey D. Wall

Published Online: 15 JUL 2005

DOI: 10.1002/047001153X.g206207

Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics

Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics

How to Cite

Wall, J. D. 2005. SNPs and human history. Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics. 2:2.6:71.

Author Information

  1. The University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 JUL 2005

Abstract

Evolutionary geneticists have shown great interest in using patterns of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variation to make inferences about models of human evolution. Although there is a large amount of variability in the patterns across regions, a couple of trends have emerged: overall levels of variability are low, indicative of a small historical effective population size, and there are systematic differences in the patterns of SNP variation both across different regions of the genome and across human populations. The connections between these broad patterns and models of human evolution are unclear, in part because of the difficulty in quantifying the verbal models of physical anthropology. This will change soon with the development of new analytical methods and the gathering of more human SNP data.

Keywords:

  • human evolution;
  • Neanderthals;
  • natural selection;
  • population bottlenecks;
  • population structure;
  • SNPs