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Pharmacogenetics and the future of medicine

Part 2. Genomics

2.6. SNPs/Haplotypes

Specialist Review

  1. Alun D. McCarthy,
  2. James L. Kennedy,
  3. Lefkos T. Middleton

Published Online: 15 NOV 2005

DOI: 10.1002/047001153X.g206211

Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics

Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics

How to Cite

McCarthy, A. D., Kennedy, J. L. and Middleton, L. T. 2005. Pharmacogenetics and the future of medicine. Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics. 2:2.6:70.

Author Information

  1. Genetics Research, GlaxoSmithKline Research & Development, Uxbridge, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 NOV 2005

Abstract

The efforts over the last 20 years to identify polymorphisms that influence human diseases are beginning to have a clear impact on medical care. The promise of the “new genetics” lies in its ability to provide information on an individual's susceptibility to disease, the exact nature of that disease, and the best therapeutic choice. During most of the history of pharmacogenetics (PGx – the use of genetic information to impact drug choice), it has been limited to simple phenotypes such as drug concentrations in plasma. Key developments in genetics technology have now made a wider range of efficacy and safety PGx studies possible, with a likely impact on a wide range of drug discovery and development activities. Existing PGx data show the ability of this approach to generate information relevant to dose selection, efficacy determination, and safety issues. This in turn will lead to significant impacts on both the design of clinical development programs and on the probability of success of those programs – the latter being a key issue for pharmaceutical companies today as well as for patients who will benefit from these novel medicines.

Keywords:

  • pharmacogenetics;
  • pharmacogenomics;
  • diagnosis;
  • drug response;
  • drug discovery;
  • drug development