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Mapping by admixture linkage disequilibrium (MALD)

Part 2. Genomics

2.6. SNPs/Haplotypes

Short Specialist Review

  1. Michael William Smith

Published Online: 15 APR 2005

DOI: 10.1002/047001153X.g206310

Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics

Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics

How to Cite

Smith, M. W. 2005. Mapping by admixture linkage disequilibrium (MALD). Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics. 2:2.6:76.

Author Information

  1. SAIC-Frederick, National Cancer Institute at Frederick, Frederick, MD, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 APR 2005

Abstract

A novel opportunity to discover the variants of genes underlying human phenotypes (particularly those relating to disease) exists because of the mixing of peoples during the last few centuries. Termed mapping by admixture linkage disequilibrium (MALD), the approach fundamentally utilizes those infrequent genetic variants that largely differentiate the racial/ethnic groups and the segmental nature of genomic material in individuals of mixed group ancestry. The methodology requires both genetic markers that differentiate groups – culled from the limited set of genetic differences between groups – and powerful analysis methodologies. Such markers are now available for MALD analysis of admixed African-Americans, and are being developed for Hispanics and other admixed groups. Together, the differentiating markers and analytic approaches allow the application of MALD to many diseases whose incidence differs between the founding groups of African-Americans and Hispanics along with other modern day populations of recently melded origins. Of course, the proof of MALD as a valid gene discovery approach rests on its successful application to disease gene discovery.

Keywords:

  • gene discovery;
  • admixture;
  • race;
  • disease;
  • methodology