Standard Article

Sample preparation for MALDI and electrospray

Part 3. Proteomics

3.1. Core Methodologies

Basic Techniques and Approaches

  1. J. I. Langridge,
  2. M. Snel

Published Online: 15 JUL 2005

DOI: 10.1002/047001153X.g301410

Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics

Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics

How to Cite

Langridge, J. I. and Snel, M. 2005. Sample preparation for MALDI and electrospray. Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics. 3:3.1:14.

Author Information

  1. Micromass UK Ltd, Manchester, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 JUL 2005

Abstract

The role of mass spectrometry in the analysis of biomolecules was revolutionized by the development of electrospray (ESI) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) ion sources. The advances made since then, in both source and mass analyzer design, have made modern mass spectrometers inherently sensitive instruments. The limiting factor for the detection of many biological compounds is not the instrumentation itself, but rather the preparation and presentation of the sample to the mass spectrometer. Sample preparation for MALDI is vital to obtaining good-quality information. The level of contaminants, choice of matrix, and spotting technique used all contribute to the sensitivity and quality of the data required. By comparison, much of the sample preparation for ESI is done using HPLC coupled on-line to the mass spectrometer. This provides a sensitive technique for the analysis of biomolecules, if performed on the micro- or nanoscale, and can be easily automated. High-sensitivity work has also been performed using microcolumn separations prior to infusion-based analysis using nanoelectrospray.

Keywords:

  • MALDI;
  • electrospray;
  • sample preparation;
  • LC-MS