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Detecting protein posttranslational modifications using small molecule probes and multiwavelength imaging devices

Part 3. Proteomics

3.2. Expression Proteomics

Short Specialist Review

  1. Wayne F. Patton

Published Online: 15 APR 2005

DOI: 10.1002/047001153X.g302313

Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics

Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics

How to Cite

Patton, W. F. 2005. Detecting protein posttranslational modifications using small molecule probes and multiwavelength imaging devices. Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics. 3:3.2:27.

Author Information

  1. Perkin-Elmer Life Sciences, Boston, MA, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 APR 2005

Abstract

Though there are alternatives to polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, such as solution-phase capillary electrophoresis, multidimensional chromatography, and microfluidic separations, the simplicity, reliability, and ready accessibility of the polyacrylamide gel ensures that it will remain a vital tool in proteomics endeavors for the foreseeable future. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) remains the single most powerful analytical tool in the proteomics arsenal for global analysis of protein posttranslational modifications. Recently, the capabilities of 2-DE have been dramatically enhanced through the introduction of fluorescence- and chemiluminescence-based detection technologies, as well as complementary advanced imaging instrumentation, that permit routine detection of protein modifications such as phosphorylation, glycosylation, and S-nitrosylation. These detection reagents are also applicable to the analysis of subproteomes on simple one-dimensional SDS-polyacrylamide gels, permitting rapid, higher throughput screening of fractionated proteins for the identification of potentially interesting samples that may subsequently be evaluated in greater detail by 2-DE. Small-molecule probes and multiwavelength imaging devices together greatly extend the capacity of gel electrophoresis with respect to the investigation of proteome-wide changes in protein posttranslational modification levels without resorting to the use of radiolabeling.

Keywords:

  • posttranslational modifications;
  • imaging devices;
  • phosphorylation;
  • glycosylation;
  • S-nitrosylation