Standard Article

Inferring gene function and biochemical networks from protein interactions

Part 3. Proteomics

3.3. Mapping of Biochemical Networks

Specialist Review

  1. Stephen W. Michnick

Published Online: 15 APR 2005

DOI: 10.1002/047001153X.g303216

Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics

Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics

How to Cite

Michnick, S. W. 2005. Inferring gene function and biochemical networks from protein interactions. Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics. 3:3.3:37.

Author Information

  1. Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 APR 2005

Abstract

Systematic studies of the organization of biochemical networks that make up the living cell can be defined by studying the organization and dynamics of protein–protein interaction. Here, I describe experimental strategies that can achieve this aim and how perturbations of interactions can be used to define the organization of biochemical networks. Resulting perturbation profiles and subcellular locations of interactions allow us to “place” each gene product at its relevant point in a network. I discuss how network mapping by PCA could work with or be used in conjunction with other genome-wide analyses of protein interactions and gene transcription to determine the dynamics of information flow through biochemical networks in the living cell. It is through such dynamic studies that the intricate networks that make up their chemical machinery of the cell may begin to be elucidated.

Keywords:

  • genomics;
  • expression cloning;
  • protein-protein interations;
  • biochemical networks;
  • chemical genetics