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Glycosylation in bacteria: that, what, how, why, now what?

Part 3. Proteomics

3.5. Proteome Diversity

Short Specialist Review

  1. Ben J. Appelmelk,
  2. Christina M. J. E. Vandenbroucke-Grauls,
  3. Wilbert Bitter

Published Online: 15 APR 2005

DOI: 10.1002/047001153X.g305301

Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics

Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics

How to Cite

Appelmelk, B. J., Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C. M. J. E. and Bitter, W. 2005. Glycosylation in bacteria: that, what, how, why, now what?. Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics. 3:3.5:69.

Author Information

  1. Vrije Universiteit Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 APR 2005

Abstract

Once considered mavericks, many bacterial species produce glycoproteins. Bacterial polypeptide glycans vary from mono- to polysaccharides, are O- or N-linked, may or may not have a eukaryotic signature, and require an apparatus sometimes organized in glycosylation islands. Recent work shows that also in prokaryotes, glycan chains serve as information carriers, and are often involved in interactions between prokaryotes and their environment, including host–pathogen interaction in human and nonhuman hosts.

Keywords:

  • glycosyltransferase;
  • glycan;
  • lectin;
  • recognition;
  • virulence factor;
  • host-specificity;
  • O-glycosylation;
  • N-glycosylation