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In silico approaches to functional analysis of proteins

Part 4. Bioinformatics

4.3. Protein Function and Annotation

Introductory Review

  1. L. Aravind

Published Online: 15 NOV 2005

DOI: 10.1002/047001153X.g403102

Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics

Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics

How to Cite

Aravind, L. 2005. In silico approaches to functional analysis of proteins. Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics. 4:4.3:29.

Author Information

  1. National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 NOV 2005

Abstract

Inference of protein function from sequence data by means of computational techniques is one of the essential requirements for biological investigations in the postgenomic era. While the basic principles of functional inference are derived from standard ideas in structural and evolutionary biology, their practical application is far from trivial. In this introductory article, we provide an overview of these principles and some definitions for frequently encountered concepts pertaining to the sequence analysis of proteins, such as conserved domains, domain architectures, nonglobular segments, and the trends in sequence conservation. We also discuss various extraneous sources of information that emerge from different contextual associations of proteins and their utility in function prediction. The remaining articles in this section delve into the specific aspects of the various themes introduced here.

Keywords:

  • protein evolution;
  • conserved domains;
  • domain architecture;
  • protein function;
  • contextual information;
  • comparative genomics;
  • phyletic profiles;
  • protein interactions;
  • DNA-binding proteins;
  • functional annotation;
  • sequence analysis;
  • superfamily;
  • fold;
  • sequence conservation;
  • sequence alignment;
  • similarity searches;
  • homology