Chapter 4.1. Drugs, Crime and the Law: An Attributional Perspective

  1. David Carson Reader in Law and Behavioural Sciences2 and
  2. Ray Bull Professor of Criminological and Legal Psychology3
  1. John B. Davies Professor of Psychology

Published Online: 2 MAR 2005

DOI: 10.1002/0470013397.ch20

Handbook of Psychology in Legal Contexts, Second Edition

Handbook of Psychology in Legal Contexts, Second Edition

How to Cite

Davies, J. B. (2003) Drugs, Crime and the Law: An Attributional Perspective, in Handbook of Psychology in Legal Contexts, Second Edition (eds D. Carson and R. Bull), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/0470013397.ch20

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Faculty of Law, The University, Southampton SO17 1BJ, UK

  2. 3

    Department of Psychology, University of Portsmouth, King Henry Building, King Henry 1 Street, Portsmouth PO1 2DY, UK

Author Information

  1. Centre for Applied Social Psychology, University of Strathclyde, Graham Hills Building, 40 George Street, Glasgow G1 1QE, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 2 MAR 2005
  2. Published Print: 15 MAR 2003

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471498742

Online ISBN: 9780470013397

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Keywords:

  • diseases, laws and social constructs;
  • determinism versus volition;
  • regression analysis

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • The Logic of Classification

  • Changing Ones State of Consciousness; A Motivated Act

  • Diseases, Laws and Social Constructs

  • Drugs and the Law

  • Determinism versus Volition

  • The Effects of the Law on Set and Setting

  • Addiction: A Functional Attribution in a Context of Illegality

  • Drug Discourses: Functional or Dysfunctional?

  • Conclusions

  • References