Chapter 4.4. Eyewitnesses

  1. David Carson Reader in Law and Behavioural Sciences2 and
  2. Ray Bull Professor of Criminological and Legal Psychology3
  1. A. Daniel Yarmey Professor of Psychology

Published Online: 2 MAR 2005

DOI: 10.1002/0470013397.ch23

Handbook of Psychology in Legal Contexts, Second Edition

Handbook of Psychology in Legal Contexts, Second Edition

How to Cite

Yarmey, A. D. (2003) Eyewitnesses, in Handbook of Psychology in Legal Contexts, Second Edition (eds D. Carson and R. Bull), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/0470013397.ch23

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Faculty of Law, The University, Southampton SO17 1BJ, UK

  2. 3

    Department of Psychology, University of Portsmouth, King Henry Building, King Henry 1 Street, Portsmouth PO1 2DY, UK

Author Information

  1. Department of Psychology, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1, Canada

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 2 MAR 2005
  2. Published Print: 15 MAR 2003

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471498742

Online ISBN: 9780470013397

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Keywords:

  • eyewitness misidentifications;
  • legal reasons for exclusion;
  • social framework

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Regina V. McIntosh and McCarthy (1997)

  • Legal Reasons for Exclusion

  • Eyewitness Research as a ‘Social Framework’

  • The Unreliability of Eyewitness Recall and Identification

  • Review of the Literature

  • ‘Average’ Performance in the Accuracy of Eyewitness Identifications

  • Postdiction Studies

  • Surveys of Common-sense Knowledge

  • Cross-racial Identification: The Other-race Effect

  • Interpretations

  • Some Recommendations

  • Us Department of Justice Guidelines on Eyewitness Evidence

  • Conclusions

  • References