Chapter 2.5. Uses, Misuses and Implications for Crime Data

  1. David Carson Reader in Law and Behavioural Sciences2 and
  2. Ray Bull Professor of Criminological and Legal Psychology3
  1. Tom Williamson Senior Research Fellow

Published Online: 2 MAR 2005

DOI: 10.1002/0470013397.ch8

Handbook of Psychology in Legal Contexts, Second Edition

Handbook of Psychology in Legal Contexts, Second Edition

How to Cite

Williamson, T. (2003) Uses, Misuses and Implications for Crime Data, in Handbook of Psychology in Legal Contexts, Second Edition (eds D. Carson and R. Bull), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/0470013397.ch8

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Faculty of Law, The University, Southampton SO17 1BJ, UK

  2. 3

    Department of Psychology, University of Portsmouth, King Henry Building, King Henry 1 Street, Portsmouth PO1 2DY, UK

Author Information

  1. Institute of Criminal Justice Studies, University of Portsmouth, Ravelin House, Ravelin Park, Museum Road, Portsmouth PO1 2QQ, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 2 MAR 2005
  2. Published Print: 15 MAR 2003

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471498742

Online ISBN: 9780470013397

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Keywords:

  • BCS measures;
  • ‘single tier’ and ‘two-tier’ control rooms;
  • good-quality crime data

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • Police Recorded Crime Statistics Are Just the Tip of the Iceberg

  • Evidence from Successive British Crime Surveys Since 1982

  • Unreported Volume Crime

  • Unreported Serious Crime

  • The Shortfall in Recording Crime Reported to the Police

  • Reasons for the Gap between Survey Data and Crimes Recorded by the Police

  • Police Discretion in Recording Reported Crime

  • Few Quality Assurances Processes for Police Data

  • The Implications of Misleading Crime Data: Rubbish In, Rubbish Out

  • No Weighting of Recorded Crime

  • Crime Data as a Performance Measure

  • ‘Problem Solving Policing’ and Analysis Hampered by Unrecorded Crime

  • The Way Forward

  • Conclusion

  • Acknowledgements

  • References