Chapter 5. The Recovered Memories Controversy: Where Do We Go from Here?

  1. Graham M. Davies DSc Professor of Psychology2 and
  2. Tim Dalgleish Research Scientist3
  1. D. Stephen Lindsay PhD Professor of Psychology Cognitive Psychologist and
  2. J. Don Read Adjunct Professor of Psychology Cognitive Psychologist

Published Online: 28 JAN 2005

DOI: 10.1002/0470013486.ch5

Recovered Memories: Seeking the Middle Ground

Recovered Memories: Seeking the Middle Ground

How to Cite

Lindsay, D. S. and Read, J. D. (2001) The Recovered Memories Controversy: Where Do We Go from Here?, in Recovered Memories: Seeking the Middle Ground (eds G. M. Davies and T. Dalgleish), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/0470013486.ch5

Editor Information

  1. 2

    University of Leicester, UK

  2. 3

    MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, UK

Author Information

  1. University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 JAN 2005
  2. Published Print: 29 OCT 2001

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471491316

Online ISBN: 9780470013489

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Keywords:

  • recovered memories of CSA;
  • transfer appropriate processing (TAP);
  • CSA-memory-oriented approaches to psychotherapy

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Where Here Is

  • How and Why

  • How and Why Do Some People Who Experienced CSA Come to Forget That They Were Abused?

  • Given Forgetting of CSA, How and Why Would Memories be Recovered?

  • How and Why Can Non-abused Adults Come Falsely to Believe That They Were Abused?

  • How Often?

  • How Prevalent Are Recovered-memory Experiences?

  • Implications

  • How Can Psychologists Improve Support for Sequelae of Recovered Memories?

  • Are There Reliable Means of Postdicting the Accuracy of Recovered-memory Reports?

  • Summary

  • References