Chapter 12. From Burden to Empowerment: The Journey of Family Caregivers in India

  1. Norman Sartorius3,
  2. Julian Leff4,
  3. Juan José López-Ibor5,
  4. Mario Maj6 and
  5. Ahmed Okasha7
  1. Radha Shankar1 and
  2. Kiran Rao2

Published Online: 31 OCT 2005

DOI: 10.1002/0470024712.ch12

Families and Mental Disorders: From Burden to Empowerment

Families and Mental Disorders: From Burden to Empowerment

How to Cite

Shankar, R. and Rao, K. (2004) From Burden to Empowerment: The Journey of Family Caregivers in India, in Families and Mental Disorders: From Burden to Empowerment (eds N. Sartorius, J. Leff, J. J. López-Ibor, M. Maj and A. Okasha), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/0470024712.ch12

Editor Information

  1. 3

    University of Geneva, Switzerland

  2. 4

    Department of Mental Health Sciences, Royal Free and University College Medical School, London and TAPS Research Unit, 69 Fleet Street, London NW3 2QU, UK

  3. 5

    Complutense University of Madrid, Spain

  4. 6

    University of Naples, Italy

  5. 7

    Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt

Author Information

  1. 1

    Malar Hospitals, 16 First Cross Street, Indira Nagar, Chennai 600020, India

  2. 2

    National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Hosur Road, Bangalore 560029, India

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 31 OCT 2005
  2. Published Print: 22 OCT 2004

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470023822

Online ISBN: 9780470024713

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Keywords:

  • Indian caregivers;
  • family-centric cultures;
  • International Pilot Study on Schizophrenia (IPSS);
  • major mental illness;
  • illness and caregiver burden;
  • traditional extended families role;
  • “functional jointedness”;
  • Patrilocal joint family;
  • mental health advocacy

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • Why Family Interventions in a Family-Centric Culture?

  • Ineffective Coping by Carers May Impact Both the Illness and Caregiver Burden

  • Optimal Professional Support Requires Sensitivity to Caregiver Needs

  • Indian Society Is Changing: Professional Inputs Have Not Kept Pace

  • Culture Is Not Static: Family-Centric Societies Also Need Family Interventions

  • Formal Family Interventions in India and Implications of the Relevant Evidence

  • Defining the Conceptual Framework for Family Work: Reduction of Relapse through Expressed Emotion Based Interventions

  • Heterogeneity in Carers and Service Settings and Limited Engagement in Treatment

  • Incorporating a Cultural Perspective

  • The Family Movement in India: A Story of Unfulfilled Promises or Great Expectations for the Future?

  • Future Directions

  • References