The Evolutionary Biology of Dengue Virus

  1. Gregory Bock Organizer and
  2. Jamie Goode
  1. Edward C. Holmes

Published Online: 7 OCT 2008

DOI: 10.1002/0470058005.ch13

New Treatment Strategies for Dengue and Other Flaviviral Diseases: Novartis Foundation Symposium 277

New Treatment Strategies for Dengue and Other Flaviviral Diseases: Novartis Foundation Symposium 277

How to Cite

Holmes, E. C. (2006) The Evolutionary Biology of Dengue Virus, in New Treatment Strategies for Dengue and Other Flaviviral Diseases: Novartis Foundation Symposium 277 (eds G. Bock and J. Goode), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/0470058005.ch13

Author Information

  1. Department of Biology, The Pennsylvania State University, Mueller Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 7 OCT 2008
  2. Published Print: 25 AUG 2006

Book Series:

  1. Novartis Foundation Symposia

Book Series Editors:

  1. Novartis Foundation

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470016435

Online ISBN: 9780470058008

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Keywords:

  • dengue virus;
  • genetic diversity;
  • origin;
  • phylogeny;
  • sylvatic cycle;
  • adaptation;
  • mutation;
  • recombination;
  • emergence;
  • virulence

Summary

Studies of the evolution of dengue virus (DENV) have blossomed during the last 20 years, in part due to the increasing availability of viral gene sequence data. Herein I review key aspects of the evolutionary biology of DENV focusing on extent and structure of genetic diversity in DENV, the time and place of DENV origin, the major mechanisms of DENV evolution, and the evolution of DENV virulence. A central conclusion is that despite the high mutation rates common to RNA viruses in general, there are important constraints against adaptive evolution in DENV in particular. These have implications for the escape from immunological recognition and hence for vaccine design. Finally, I note that a fuller understanding of DENV evolution will require more extensive study of the sylvatic cycle, particularly in Africa, which has been largely ignored to date.