Developing Vaccines against Flavivirus Diseases: Past Success, Present Hopes and Future Challenges

  1. Gregory Bock Organizer and
  2. Jamie Goode
  1. John R. Stephenson

Published Online: 7 OCT 2008

DOI: 10.1002/0470058005.ch14

New Treatment Strategies for Dengue and Other Flaviviral Diseases: Novartis Foundation Symposium 277

New Treatment Strategies for Dengue and Other Flaviviral Diseases: Novartis Foundation Symposium 277

How to Cite

Stephenson, J. R. (2008) Developing Vaccines against Flavivirus Diseases: Past Success, Present Hopes and Future Challenges, in New Treatment Strategies for Dengue and Other Flaviviral Diseases: Novartis Foundation Symposium 277 (eds G. Bock and J. Goode), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/0470058005.ch14

Author Information

  1. Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 7 OCT 2008
  2. Published Print: 25 AUG 2006

Book Series:

  1. Novartis Foundation Symposia

Book Series Editors:

  1. Novartis Foundation

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470016435

Online ISBN: 9780470058008

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Keywords:

  • dengue vaccine and vaccine development;
  • vaccine delivery barriers;
  • conventional immunization strategies;
  • immune stimulators and vaccine efficiency;
  • non-structural protein based vaccine

Summary

Vaccination still remains the most cost-effective way of protecting large populations against infectious disease. Safe and effective vaccines are available against most pathogenic flaviviruses and in recent years substantial progress has been made in developing vaccines against dengue. Dengue vaccines based on conventional and recombinant DNA technologies are being assessed and initial results are encouraging. Many other experimental vaccines have been developed, but despite the intensity of effort, concerns about the safety of new vaccines appear to be hindering their development. With the global threat from dengue increasing, might it now be the time to consider a less riskaverse approach?