The Search for Rod-Dependent Cone Viability Factors, Secreted Factors Promoting Cone Viability

  1. Gregory Bock Organizer,
  2. Gerry Chader Organizer and
  3. Jamie Goode
  1. Thierry Léveillard1,
  2. Saddek Mohand-Saïd1,
  3. Anne Claire Fintz1,
  4. George Lambrou2 and
  5. José-Alain Sahel1,*

Published Online: 7 OCT 2008

DOI: 10.1002/0470092645.ch9

Retinal Dystrophies: Functional Genomics to Gene Therapy: Novartis Foundation Symposium 255

Retinal Dystrophies: Functional Genomics to Gene Therapy: Novartis Foundation Symposium 255

How to Cite

Léveillard, T., Mohand-Saïd, S., Fintz, A. C., Lambrou, G. and Sahel, J.-A. (2003) The Search for Rod-Dependent Cone Viability Factors, Secreted Factors Promoting Cone Viability, in Retinal Dystrophies: Functional Genomics to Gene Therapy: Novartis Foundation Symposium 255 (eds G. Bock, G. Chader and J. Goode), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/0470092645.ch9

Author Information

  1. 1

    Laboratoire de Physiopathologie Cellulaire et Moléculaire de la Rétine, Université Pierre et Marie Curie and Inserm u592, Hôpital Saint-Antoine, Bâtiment Kourilsky, 6ème étage, 184 rue du Faubourg Saint-Antoine, 75571 Paris Cedex 12, France

  2. 2

    Novartis-Ophthalmics, Klybeckstrasse 141, CH-4002 Basel, Switzerland

*Chef de Service, CHNO des Quinze-Vingts, 28 rue de Charenton, F-75557 Paris Cedex 12, France

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 7 OCT 2008
  2. Published Print: 9 DEC 2003

Book Series:

  1. Novartis Foundation Symposia

Book Series Editors:

  1. Novartis Foundation

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470853573

Online ISBN: 9780470092644

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Summary

During the last decade, numerous research reports have considerably improved our knowledge of the pathophysiology of retinal degenerations. Three non-mutually exclusive general areas dealing with therapeutic approaches have been proposed: gene therapy, pharmacology and retinal transplantations. The observation that cone photoreceptors, even those seemingly unaffected by any described anomaly, die secondarily to rod disappearance related to mutations expressed specifically in the latter, led us to study the interactions between these two photoreceptor populations to search for possible causal links between rod degeneration and cone death. These in vivo and in vitro studies suggest that paracrine interactions between both cell types exist and that rods are necessary for continued cone survival. We have developed a protocol that is used to evaluate the potential of all sequences in a retinal library to generate a protective effect on cones from cone-enriched cultures from chicken embryo. The protocol of expression cloning is a systematic approach aimed at screening all genes normally expressed by retina. Since the role of cones in visual perception is essential, pending the identification of the factors mediating these interactions underway, rod replacement by transplantation and/or neuroprotection by trophic factors or alternative pharmacological means appear as promising approaches for limiting secondary cone loss in currently untreatable blinding conditions.