Chapter 3. The Electronic Shop

  1. Mark Norris1 and
  2. Steve West2

Published Online: 5 OCT 2001

DOI: 10.1002/0470841508.ch3

eBusiness Essentials: Technology and Network Requirements for Mobile and Online Markets, Second Edition

eBusiness Essentials: Technology and Network Requirements for Mobile and Online Markets, Second Edition

How to Cite

Norris, M. and West, S. (2001) The Electronic Shop, in eBusiness Essentials: Technology and Network Requirements for Mobile and Online Markets, Second Edition, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/0470841508.ch3

Author Information

  1. 1

    Norwest Communications, UK

  2. 2

    BT, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 5 OCT 2001

Book Series:

  1. Wiley–BT Series

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471521839

Online ISBN: 9780470841501

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • low-end commercial catalogues;
  • low-end DIY catalogues;
  • high-end catalogues;
  • retail;
  • wholesale;
  • many-to-many markets;
  • market mediation;
  • off-the-shelf commerce platforms;
  • agents

Summary

When you walk down any high street, there is an obvious difference between the shops you see. Some, like the banks, don't have any goods on display but just display lots of logos. Others have attractive displays with discrete price tags (if any), and others still pile their goods high and promise that you can't buy cheaper anywhere else. Each style appeals to a different part of us – sometimes we are driven by quality, sometimes by desire and sometimes by economy.

The subtlety of the high street needs to be recreated for the online shop, and that is where this chapter has focused. The various forms of catalogue – the statement of what is for sale – have been explained and their use discussed. It is the form of these catalogues that determines their purpose, with some optimised for volume trade at best price, some for specialist purchases.