Chapter 5. Trust and Security

  1. Mark Norris1 and
  2. Steve West2

Published Online: 5 OCT 2001

DOI: 10.1002/0470841508.ch5

eBusiness Essentials: Technology and Network Requirements for Mobile and Online Markets, Second Edition

eBusiness Essentials: Technology and Network Requirements for Mobile and Online Markets, Second Edition

How to Cite

Norris, M. and West, S. (2001) Trust and Security, in eBusiness Essentials: Technology and Network Requirements for Mobile and Online Markets, Second Edition, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/0470841508.ch5

Author Information

  1. 1

    Norwest Communications, UK

  2. 2

    BT, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 5 OCT 2001

Book Series:

  1. Wiley–BT Series

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471521839

Online ISBN: 9780470841501

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Keywords:

  • privacy;
  • encryption;
  • digital signatures;
  • trust;
  • smart cards;
  • security good practice;
  • Public Key Infrastructures

Summary

Concerns over the security of the Internet, much hyped by the media, have done little to reassure users that the Internet is a safe place to trade. This chapter has explained the various forms of attack that a net-borne business can suffer. It then goes on to detail the various mechanisms that are available to ensure security, privacy and trust over the net. The major security issues include:

  • Confidentiality—data must not be visible to eavesdroppers.

  • Authentication—communicating parties must be certain of each other's identity and / or credentials.

  • Integrity—communicating parties must know when data has been tampered with.

  • Non-repudiation—it must be possible to prove that a transaction has taken place.

In terms of solutions, we explain

  • encryption—for data protection and assurance.

  • digital certificates—that allow trading parties to know who they are dealing with,

and how a Public Key Infrastructure, along with strong encryption algorithms, make these security measures a practical proposition.