Chapter 18a. Blood-borne Filarial Infections: Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi, Brugia timori, Loa loa, Mansonella perstans and Mansonella ozzardi

  1. Stephen H. Gillespie2 and
  2. Richard D. Pearson3
  1. Thomas B. Nutman

Published Online: 29 APR 2002

DOI: 10.1002/0470842504.ch18a

Principles and Practise of Clinical Parasitology

Principles and Practise of Clinical Parasitology

How to Cite

Nutman, T. B. (2001) Blood-borne Filarial Infections: Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi, Brugia timori, Loa loa, Mansonella perstans and Mansonella ozzardi, in Principles and Practise of Clinical Parasitology (eds S. H. Gillespie and R. D. Pearson), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/0470842504.ch18a

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Department of Medical Microbiology, Royal Free and University College Hospital Medical School, Pond Street, London NW3 2QG, UK

  2. 3

    University of Virginia Health Sciences Center, 300 Park Place, MR4 Buildings, Room 2115, Charlottesville, V A 22908, USA

Author Information

  1. Helminth Immunology Section and Clinical Parasitology Unit, Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Building 4, Room B1-03, Bethesda, MD 20892-0425, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 29 APR 2002
  2. Published Print: 1 NOV 2001

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471977292

Online ISBN: 9780470842508

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Keywords:

  • filarial infections;
  • Wuchereria bancrofti;
  • Bruggia malayi;
  • Brugia timori;
  • Loa loa;
  • Mansonella perstans;
  • Mansonella ozzardi

Summary

Filarial worms are nematodes or roundworms that dwell in the subcutaneous tissues and the lymphatics. Although eight filarial species commonly infect humans, six are typically considered blood borne, in that the parasite stages infectious for the vector reside in the blood. These are the causative agents of lymphatic filariasis: Brugia malayi, B. timori, Wuchereria bancrofti, Loa loa, and two Mansonella species, M. ozzardi and M. perstans. Taken together, these human filarial parasites infect an estimated 200 million persons worldwide. There are significant differences in the clinical manifestations of filariasis, or at least in the time course over which these infections are required, in patients native to the endemic areas and those who are travellers to, or recent arrivals in, these same areas.

Figure 18a.4 (Differential charactizations of microfilariae) is reproduced from Clinical Parasitology, 7th Edition, by Craig and Faust (1964), Lea and Febiger, Philadelphia, PA. The publisher's homepage can be accessed at www.lww.com.