Chapter 9. Hypnosis and Depression

  1. Graham D. Burrows2,
  2. Robb O. Stanley2 and
  3. Peter B. Bloom3
  1. Graham D. Burrows2 and
  2. Sandra G. Boughton1

Published Online: 28 DEC 2001

DOI: 10.1002/0470846402.ch9

International Handbook of Clinical Hypnosis

International Handbook of Clinical Hypnosis

How to Cite

Burrows, G. D. and Boughton, S. G. (2001) Hypnosis and Depression, in International Handbook of Clinical Hypnosis (eds G. D. Burrows, R. O. Stanley and P. B. Bloom), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/0470846402.ch9

Editor Information

  1. 2

    The University of Melbourne, Australia

  2. 3

    The University of Pennsylvania, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Western Australia, Australia

  2. 2

    The University of Melbourne, Australia

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 DEC 2001
  2. Published Print: 9 AUG 2001

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471970095

Online ISBN: 9780470846407

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Keywords:

  • hypnosis;
  • depression;
  • suicide risk;
  • cognitive behaviour therapy;
  • hopelessness;
  • ego strengthening;
  • hypnotizability;
  • cognitive dissociative model

Summary

There has been a widespread assumption that hypnosis has no role, indeed is inappropriate, in the management of depression. Despite this traditional view, a range of case reports can be found in the literature describing the use of hypnosis with a variety of therapeutic goals. The reluctance to use hypnosis in the management of depression has been associated with concerns related to suicide risk, the limited capacity of severely depressed individuals to utilize hypnosis, potential for further deterioration, and the possibility that hypnosis may reinforce depression. In order to usefully explore the value of hypnosis in the management of depression it is necessary to consider varying models of hypnosis and the ways in which hypnosis can facilitate established therapeutic approaches. A range of possibilities exist for the integration of hypnosis with cognitive behavioural techniques.