Chapter 1. Epidemiology of Anxiety Disorders

  1. Eric J.L. Griez1,
  2. Carlo Faravelli2,
  3. David Nutt3 and
  4. Joseph Zohar4
  1. T. Overbeek,
  2. E. Vermetten and
  3. E.J.L. Griez

Published Online: 6 DEC 2001

DOI: 10.1002/0470846437.ch1

Anxiety Disorders: An Introduction to Clinical Management and Research

Anxiety Disorders: An Introduction to Clinical Management and Research

How to Cite

Overbeek, T., Vermetten, E. and Griez, E.J.L. (2001) Epidemiology of Anxiety Disorders, in Anxiety Disorders: An Introduction to Clinical Management and Research (eds E. J.L. Griez, C. Faravelli, D. Nutt and J. Zohar), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/0470846437.ch1

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, University of Maastricht, The Netherlands

  2. 2

    Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Florence University Medical School, Italy

  3. 3

    Psychopharmacology Unit, School of Medical Sciences, University of Bristol, UK

  4. 4

    Department of Psychiatry and Anxiety Clinic, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, University of Tel Aviv, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Israel

Author Information

  1. Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, University of Maastricht, The Netherlands

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 6 DEC 2001
  2. Published Print: 29 MAY 2001

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471978732

Online ISBN: 9780470846438

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Keywords:

  • anxiety disorders;
  • epidemiology;
  • diagnosis;
  • comorbidity;
  • panic disorder;
  • social phobia;
  • obsessive-compulsive disorder

Summary

Anxiety disorders have a high impact on daily life (illness intrusiveness) and cause a great deal of suffering for the individual patient. They also have a substantial impact economically. In the last decades some large epidemiological studies have provided much information about the occurrence of psychiatric disorders in general and anxiety disorders in particular. Clinical studies often reveal different prevalence rates and comorbidity figures from population-based surveys and this is partly due to selection bias and severity of symptoms, and diagnostic criteria and instruments used. Epidemiological studies have often used different diagnostic instruments, different sampling procedures, different case definitions, different time frames for the diagnoses (e.g. lifetime, six-month prevalence or current diagnoses) and different severity ratings for diagnostic decisions.