Chapter 11. Post-Traumatic Syndromes: Comparative Biology and Psychology

  1. Eric J.L. Griez2,
  2. Carlo Faravelli3,
  3. David Nutt4 and
  4. Joseph Zohar5
  1. W.S. de Loos

Published Online: 6 DEC 2001

DOI: 10.1002/0470846437.ch11

Anxiety Disorders: An Introduction to Clinical Management and Research

Anxiety Disorders: An Introduction to Clinical Management and Research

How to Cite

de Loos, W.S. (2001) Post-Traumatic Syndromes: Comparative Biology and Psychology, in Anxiety Disorders: An Introduction to Clinical Management and Research (eds E. J.L. Griez, C. Faravelli, D. Nutt and J. Zohar), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/0470846437.ch11

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, University of Maastricht, The Netherlands

  2. 3

    Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Florence University Medical School, Italy

  3. 4

    Psychopharmacology Unit, School of Medical Sciences, University of Bristol, UK

  4. 5

    Department of Psychiatry and Anxiety Clinic, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, University of Tel Aviv, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Israel

Author Information

  1. Central Military Hospital, Utrecht, The Netherlands

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 6 DEC 2001
  2. Published Print: 29 MAY 2001

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471978732

Online ISBN: 9780470846438

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Keywords:

  • anxiety disorders;
  • post-traumatic stress;
  • DSM-IV;
  • stress;
  • diagnosis;
  • comorbidity

Summary

The concept of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is now well known, after it was introduced into DSM-III in 1980. The clinical manifestation of PTSD can occur a long time, even decades, after the initial traumatic experience. It may be triggered by associations (symbols of retraumatisation) and by other challenges to a state of psychosocial compensation that could only be attained by considerable mental effort.Psychotraumatic disturbances have their roots in a combination of three elements, which are the perception of threat, the inability to control such a threat and the consequence disruption of existential stability and expectancy. Although anxiety is supposedly an overwhelming sensation during such a threat, it is not always reported as such, afterwards; this may be related to peri-traumatic dissociation.