Chapter 2. Genetics of Anxiety Disorders: Part I

  1. Eric J.L. Griez2,
  2. Carlo Faravelli3,
  3. David Nutt4 and
  4. Joseph Zohar5
  1. M.C. Cavallini and
  2. L. Bellodi

Published Online: 6 DEC 2001

DOI: 10.1002/0470846437.ch2

Anxiety Disorders: An Introduction to Clinical Management and Research

Anxiety Disorders: An Introduction to Clinical Management and Research

How to Cite

Cavallini, M.C. and Bellodi, L. (2001) Genetics of Anxiety Disorders: Part I, in Anxiety Disorders: An Introduction to Clinical Management and Research (eds E. J.L. Griez, C. Faravelli, D. Nutt and J. Zohar), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/0470846437.ch2

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, University of Maastricht, The Netherlands

  2. 3

    Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Florence University Medical School, Italy

  3. 4

    Psychopharmacology Unit, School of Medical Sciences, University of Bristol, UK

  4. 5

    Department of Psychiatry and Anxiety Clinic, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, University of Tel Aviv, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Israel

Author Information

  1. Fondazione Centro San Raffaele del Monte Tabor, Milan, Italy

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 6 DEC 2001
  2. Published Print: 29 MAY 2001

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471978732

Online ISBN: 9780470846438

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Keywords:

  • anxiety disorders;
  • genetics;
  • obsessive-compulsive disorders;
  • panic disorder;
  • diagnosis;
  • post-traumatic stress disorder

Summary

Anxiety disorders are a heterogeneous group of psychiatric disorders with no clear knowledge of their aetiology and pathogenesis. Several familial, biological, and genetic risk factors have been invoked for the obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) or the panic disorder (PD), but to date none has shown a main role in their aetiology. The observation that some pharmacological treatments substantially modify the prognosis of affected patients may be one of the main proofs of the role of biological factors in the development of these illnesses. Additional support for the biological hypothesis derives from neuroradiological images. Furthermore, the presence of secondary cases in families of probands affected with anxiety disorders suggests the existence of a familial component and probably a genetically transmissible basis for specific liabilities.