Chapter 7. Social Phobia

  1. Eric J.L. Griez2,
  2. Carlo Faravelli3,
  3. David Nutt4 and
  4. Joseph Zohar5
  1. C. Faravelli3,
  2. T. Zucchi1,
  3. A. Perone1,
  4. R. Salmoria1 and
  5. B. Viviani1

Published Online: 6 DEC 2001

DOI: 10.1002/0470846437.ch7

Anxiety Disorders: An Introduction to Clinical Management and Research

Anxiety Disorders: An Introduction to Clinical Management and Research

How to Cite

Faravelli, C., Zucchi, T., Perone, A., Salmoria, R. and Viviani, B. (2001) Social Phobia, in Anxiety Disorders: An Introduction to Clinical Management and Research (eds E. J.L. Griez, C. Faravelli, D. Nutt and J. Zohar), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/0470846437.ch7

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, University of Maastricht, The Netherlands

  2. 3

    Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Florence University Medical School, Italy

  3. 4

    Psychopharmacology Unit, School of Medical Sciences, University of Bristol, UK

  4. 5

    Department of Psychiatry and Anxiety Clinic, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, University of Tel Aviv, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Israel

Author Information

  1. 1

    Florence University Medical School, Florence, Italy

  2. 3

    Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Florence University Medical School, Italy

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 6 DEC 2001
  2. Published Print: 29 MAY 2001

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471978732

Online ISBN: 9780470846438

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Keywords:

  • anxiety disorders;
  • social phobia;
  • comorbidity;
  • benzodiazapines;
  • diagnosis;
  • avoidant personality disorder;
  • pharmacotherapy;
  • SSRIs;
  • MAOIs;
  • psychotherapy

Summary

Social phobia (SP) is a condition characterised by an intense, irrational, persistent fear of being scrutinised or evaluated by others, with the patient anticipating humiliation or ridicule. The fear may involve most social interactions/situations where it is possible to be judged or be confronted with specific public performance. Anticipation of these situations is also experienced with uneasiness, distress or fear. The course of SP is that of a chronic, unremitting lifelong disease and secondary complications such as depression, substance abuse (alcohol or tranquillisers) and suicide attempts may be associated with it, thus making the disorder severely disabling. SP is increasingly recognised as one of the more common anxiety disorders.