Chapter 8. Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Diagnostic Considerations and an Epidemiological Update

  1. Eric J.L. Griez2,
  2. Carlo Faravelli3,
  3. David Nutt4 and
  4. Joseph Zohar5
  1. Y. Sasson1,
  2. M. Chopra1,
  3. R. Amiaz1,
  4. I. Iancu1 and
  5. J. Zohar5

Published Online: 6 DEC 2001

DOI: 10.1002/0470846437.ch8

Anxiety Disorders: An Introduction to Clinical Management and Research

Anxiety Disorders: An Introduction to Clinical Management and Research

How to Cite

Sasson, Y., Chopra, M., Amiaz, R., Iancu, I. and Zohar, J. (2001) Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Diagnostic Considerations and an Epidemiological Update, in Anxiety Disorders: An Introduction to Clinical Management and Research (eds E. J.L. Griez, C. Faravelli, D. Nutt and J. Zohar), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/0470846437.ch8

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, University of Maastricht, The Netherlands

  2. 3

    Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Florence University Medical School, Italy

  3. 4

    Psychopharmacology Unit, School of Medical Sciences, University of Bristol, UK

  4. 5

    Department of Psychiatry and Anxiety Clinic, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, University of Tel Aviv, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Israel

Author Information

  1. 1

    Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer and Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel

  2. 5

    Department of Psychiatry and Anxiety Clinic, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, University of Tel Aviv, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Israel

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 6 DEC 2001
  2. Published Print: 29 MAY 2001

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471978732

Online ISBN: 9780470846438

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Keywords:

  • anxiety disorders;
  • obsessive-compulsive disorder;
  • DSM-IV;
  • comorbidity;
  • phobia;
  • schizophrenia

Summary

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a common, chronic, and disabling disorder characterised by obsessions and/or compulsions. These symptoms are ego-dystonic and cause significant distress to patients and their families. Up until the early 1980's, OCD was considered a rare, treatment-refractory, chronic condition, of psychological origin. Since then, however, several researchers have reported that the prevalence of OCD is around 2% in the general population and it is almost equally distributed between males and females.