Chapter 31. Promoting Self-Management in Primary Care Settings: Limitations and Opportunities: A Commentary

  1. R. Williams2,
  2. W. Herman3,
  3. A.-L. Kinmonth5 and
  4. N. J. Wareham4
  1. Michael G. Goldstein

Published Online: 9 APR 2003

DOI: 10.1002/0470846585.ch31

The Evidence Base for Diabetes Care

The Evidence Base for Diabetes Care

How to Cite

Goldstein, M. G. (2002) Promoting Self-Management in Primary Care Settings: Limitations and Opportunities: A Commentary, in The Evidence Base for Diabetes Care (eds R. Williams, W. Herman, A.-L. Kinmonth and N. J. Wareham), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/0470846585.ch31

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Nuffield Institute for Health, University of Leeds, 71-75 Clarendon Road, Leeds LS2 9PL, UK

  2. 3

    Department of Internal Medicine and Epidemiology, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, 3920 Taubman Center, Box 0345, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA

  3. 4

    Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Institute of Public Health, University Forvie Site, Robinson Way, Cambridge CB2 2SR, UK

  4. 5

    General Practice and Primary Care Research Unit, Dept. of Public Health & Primary Care, Institute of Public Health, University Forvie Site, Robinson Way, Cambridge CB2 2SR, UK

Author Information

  1. Clinical Education and Research, Bayer Institute for Health Care Communication, 400 Morgan Lane, West Haven, CT 06516, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 9 APR 2003
  2. Published Print: 27 AUG 2002

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471988762

Online ISBN: 9780470846582

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Keywords:

  • patient activation;
  • patient empowerment;
  • self-determination theory;
  • transtheoretical model of change;
  • motivational interviewing;
  • counselling;
  • chronic disease program;
  • goal-setting

Summary

The evidence reviewed in Chapter 30 that links efforts to promote patient self-management with the outcomes of diabetes care is extremely difficult to evaluate. Studies vary widely across several domains, including the definition of self-management, the populations of patients and providers, the type of study, the level at which the patient self-management was delivered and the type of outcomes studied. Roter & Kinmonth proposed five principles for effective clinician-patient communication. This commentary reviews additional evidence that might inform and guide translation of research results into clinical practice. It also offers recommendations for implementing interventions to promote self-management in health care settings.