Intrinsic and Extrinsic Control of Cortical Development

  1. Gregory R. Bock and
  2. Gail Cardew
  1. John L. R. Rubenstein

Published Online: 29 APR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/0470846631.ch6

Evolutionary Developmental Biology of the Cerebral Cortex: Novartis Foundation Symposium 228

Evolutionary Developmental Biology of the Cerebral Cortex: Novartis Foundation Symposium 228

How to Cite

Rubenstein, J. L. R. (2000) Intrinsic and Extrinsic Control of Cortical Development, in Evolutionary Developmental Biology of the Cerebral Cortex: Novartis Foundation Symposium 228 (eds G. R. Bock and G. Cardew), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/0470846631.ch6

Author Information

  1. Nina Ireland Laboratory of Developmental Neurobiology, Center for Neurobiology and Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry and Programs in Neuroscience, Developmental Biology and Biomedical Sciences, University of California at San Francisco, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 29 APR 2008
  2. Published Print: 22 MAY 2000

Book Series:

  1. Novartis Foundation Symposia

Book Series Editors:

  1. Novartis Foundation

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471979784

Online ISBN: 9780470846636

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Keywords:

  • cortical;
  • development;
  • cerebral cortex;
  • transcription;
  • telencephalon;
  • SHH;
  • WNT;
  • GDF;
  • Gbx2

Summary

Recent advances in the study of cerebral cortical early development are described in this chapter. The role of the anterior neural ridge in regulating telencephalon induction in the neural plate is discussed, followed by a review of the evidence for the roles of ventral, rostral and dorsal patterning centres in regulating regionalization of the telencephalon. The patterning centres produce secreted molecules (SHH, FGF, BMP, WNT) that regulate the expression of transcription factors which control regional identity, cell type specification, proliferation and differentiation. These intrinsic patterning mechanisms appear to be sufficient to generate much of the regional organization of the cerebral cortex present in newborn mice. While intrinsic mechanisms have a major role in cortical regionalization and in the production of cortical projection neurons, many cortical interneurons are derived from the basal ganglia and then migrate into the cerebral cortex. Furthermore, thalamic afferents appear to have an important role in maturation of the postnatal rodent cortex. Thus, both intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms control development of the cerebral cortex.